Gliese 436 c

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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Edasich on 6th September 2010, 9:25 am

No, please. Non-detections are the naughtiest things XD
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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by tommi59 on 6th September 2010, 12:24 pm

I hope not
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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by tommi59 on 6th September 2010, 12:25 pm

I hope venus like planet
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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Edasich on 6th September 2010, 3:12 pm

tommi59 wrote:I hope venus like planet

Have you crossed fingers? Wink
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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Lazarus on 6th September 2010, 4:04 pm

Actually low-mass planets in systems which have had significant migration ought to have their compositions altered by the movement of material through the system. Presumably they would have more icy material in their makeup thanks to the migrating planet bringing it in from regions further out in the disc.
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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 6th September 2010, 4:11 pm

Do icy sub-Earths form very easily in such a disk?
I've always imaged planets dominated by water ice to be super-Earths... but I can't think of a good reason for this to be so*, and may just be a result of the discussion of the super-Earths to date.

*Edit: Low mass terrestrial planets should have a hard time migrating through the disk, right?

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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Edasich on 6th September 2010, 4:13 pm

Lazarus wrote:Actually low-mass planets in systems which have had significant migration ought to have their compositions altered by the movement of material through the system. Presumably they would have more icy material in their makeup thanks to the migrating planet bringing it in from regions further out in the disc.

Even a low-mass planet (I assume <0.5 Me or within 0.3 Me)? I mean, can supercritic ice be still retained by such a tiny planet and in such close orbit? Maybe a carbon-chondrite based world rather supercritic-icy one?
Better to speculate after (putative) announcement.
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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 6th September 2010, 8:09 pm

http://arxiv.org/abs/1009.0755

No planet ;P!

we conclude that the earlier candidate transit signals resulted from correlated noise in the EPOXI and Spitzer 8 Ám observations.

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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Borislav on 6th September 2010, 9:58 pm

Of course a little harsh, but it shows once again how difficult it is to discovery a small planet.
Before that was.
http://arxiv.org/abs/1002.4707

But let's wait for the results of Kepler.

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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Borislav on 7th September 2010, 3:23 am

I understand correctly, that the anticipated period of the candidate was only 2.1071 days?

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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 7th September 2010, 1:47 pm

Borislav wrote:I understand correctly, that the anticipated period of the candidate was only 2.1071 days?

Approximately.

We further uncovered evidence for a 0.75 RE transiting planet, in a orbit close to a 4:5 resonance with GJ 436 b...

The orbit would be interior to Gliese 436 b:
Second, there is also the small possibility of an occultation of GJ 436c by GJ 436b.

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Re: Gliese 436 c

Post by Lazarus on 7th September 2010, 2:30 pm

Sirius_Alpha gets the Nostradamus points. Then again it is impressive to see how far the detection technology has come, what with detections of sub-Earth radius planets being possible.
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Re: Gliese 436 c

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