HATnet Results

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 3rd January 2012, 9:27 pm

Four new planets, HAT-P-34b through HAT-P-37b
http://arxiv.org/abs/1201.0659


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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 4th January 2012, 5:57 am

Nice opening for the new year Very Happy
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 24th January 2012, 9:28 pm

A hot Saturn at HAT-P-38.
http://arxiv.org/abs/1201.5075

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 15th July 2012, 8:15 pm

Three more inflated, lower-mass hot Jupiters.
http://arxiv.org/abs/1207.3344

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 1st January 2013, 7:14 am

The new year starts very well with two more HATNet planets!

HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b. Two Inflated Transiting Hot Jupiters from the HATNet Survey

First identified from the HATNet wide-field photometric survey, these candidate transiting planets were then followed-up with a variety of photometric observations. Determining the planetary nature of the objects and characterizing the parameters of the systems were mainly done with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93m telescope at OHP and the TRES spectrograph at the 1.5m telescope at FLWO. HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b are typical hot Jupiters on circular orbits around early-G/late-F main sequence host stars, with periods of 4.641876\pm0.000032 and 3.332688\pm0.000016 days, masses of 0.975\pm0.126 and 0.660\pm0.083 Mjup, and radii of 1.277\pm0.149 and 1.283+0.057-0.034 Rjup, respectively. These discoveries increase the sample of planets with measured mean densities, which is needed to constrain theories of planetary interiors and atmospheres. Moreover, their hosts are relatively bright (V < 13.5) facilitating further follow-up studies.


Happy New Year! santa
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by tommi59 on 28th January 2013, 3:03 pm

Paper about HAT-P-7 on sciencedaily confirmation planet c
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Lazarus on 28th January 2013, 3:11 pm

tommi59 wrote:Paper about HAT-P-7 on sciencedaily confirmation planet c
Looks like this has finally gotten a press release. Paper referenced is the same.
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Lazarus on 29th January 2013, 1:56 am

An update on the HAT-P-17 two-planet system. The outer planet HAT-P-17c is less well constrained than previously thought.

The Stellar Obliquity and the Long-period planet in the HAT-P-17 Exoplanetary System
http://arxiv.org/abs/1301.6289
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by tommi59 on 29th January 2013, 5:05 am

So we know really nothing .There could be 1 long period companion but also can be 2 or even 3 less massive planets as in case our solar system
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 13th August 2013, 9:52 pm

HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, and HAT-P-46b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters in Possible Multi-Planet Systems
http://arxiv.org/abs/1308.2937

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 14th August 2013, 2:16 pm

EPE entries (plus the additional non transiting planets):

http://exoplanet.eu/catalog/hat-p-44_b/
http://exoplanet.eu/catalog/hat-p-44_c/
http://exoplanet.eu/catalog/hat-p-45_b/
http://exoplanet.eu/catalog/hat-p-46_b/
http://exoplanet.eu/catalog/hat-p-46_c/
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 21st January 2014, 9:25 pm

HAT-P-49
http://arxiv.org/abs/1401.5460

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 22nd January 2014, 4:52 am

I don't get this new "trend" to announce planets without following the numerical order (like KELT, Kepler...). Suspect

By the way a new hot Jupiter orbiting an early F type star, much hotter than Corot-11. Smile
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 22nd January 2014, 5:26 am

Edasich wrote:I don't get this new "trend" to announce planets without following the numerical order (like KELT, Kepler...). Suspect
It has to do with how easy it is to confirm a planet not necessarily being scaled to when the planet is discovered. If Sirius_Alpha 1b is discovered before Sirius_Alpha 2b, but 2b orbits a brighter star and is easier to confirm, you might see Sirius_Alpha 2b on arXiv before you see 1b, simply because it was easier to secure the fewer resources needed for its confirmation.

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 23rd January 2014, 4:21 am

Sirius_Alpha wrote:
Edasich wrote:I don't get this new "trend" to announce planets without following the numerical order (like KELT, Kepler...). Suspect
It has to do with how easy it is to confirm a planet not necessarily being scaled to when the planet is discovered. If Sirius_Alpha 1b is discovered before Sirius_Alpha 2b, but 2b orbits a brighter star and is easier to confirm, you might see Sirius_Alpha 2b on arXiv before you see 1b, simply because it was easier to secure the fewer resources needed for its confirmation.

I see. That's got be the case. Rolling Eyes
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 18th April 2014, 3:35 am

Bouncing from HAT-P-49 b to HAT-P-54 b.

HAT-P-54b: A hot jupiter transiting a 0.64 Msun star in field 0 of the K2 mission

We report the discovery of HAT-P-54b, a planet transiting a late K dwarf star in field 0 of the NASA K2 mission. We combine ground-based photometric light curves with radial velocity measurements to determine the physical parameters of the system. HAT-P-54b has a mass of 0.760 0.032 MJ, a radius of 0.944 0.028 RJ, and an orbital period of 3.7998 d. The star has V = 13.505 0.060, a mass of 0.645 0.020 M⊙, a radius of 0.617 0.013 R⊙, an effective temperature of Teff = 4390 50K, and a subsolar metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.127 0.080. HAT-P-54b has a radius that is smaller than 92% of the known transiting planets with masses greater than that of Saturn, while HAT-P-54 is one of the lowest-mass stars known to host a hot Jupiter. Follow-up high-precision photometric observations by the K2 mission promise to make this a well-studied planetary system.

P.S.

What's with 47, 48 and 50 to 53?? Suspect
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 16th March 2015, 4:39 am

Edasich wrote:Bouncing from HAT-P-49 b to HAT-P-54 b.

HAT-P-54b: A hot jupiter transiting a 0.64 Msun star in field 0 of the K2 mission

We report the discovery of HAT-P-54b, a planet transiting a late K dwarf star in field 0 of the NASA K2 mission. We combine ground-based photometric light curves with radial velocity measurements to determine the physical parameters of the system. HAT-P-54b has a mass of 0.760 0.032 MJ, a radius of 0.944 0.028 RJ, and an orbital period of 3.7998 d. The star has V = 13.505 0.060, a mass of 0.645 0.020 M⊙, a radius of 0.617 0.013 R⊙, an effective temperature of Teff = 4390 50K, and a subsolar metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.127 0.080. HAT-P-54b has a radius that is smaller than 92% of the known transiting planets with masses greater than that of Saturn, while HAT-P-54 is one of the lowest-mass stars known to host a hot Jupiter. Follow-up high-precision photometric observations by the K2 mission promise to make this a well-studied planetary system.

P.S.

What's with 47, 48 and 50 to 53?? Suspect

Quoting... myself here are some of the missing ones to the count Laughing

HAT-P-50b, HAT-P-51b, HAT-P-52b, and HAT-P-53b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters and a Transiting Hot Saturn From the HATNet Survey

We report the discovery and characterization of four transiting exoplanets by the HATNet survey. The planet HAT-P-50b has a mass of 1.35 M_J and a radius of 1.29 R_J, and orbits a bright (V = 11.8 mag) M = 1.27 M_sun, R = 1.70 R_sun star every P = 3.1220 days. The planet HAT-P-51b has a mass of 0.31 M_J and a radius of 1.29 R_J, and orbits a V = 13.4 mag, M = 0.98 M_sun, R = 1.04 R_sun star with a period of P = 4.2180 days. The planet HAT-P-52b has a mass of 0.82 M_J and a radius of 1.01 R_J, and orbits a V = 14.1 mag, M = 0.89 M_sun, R = 0.89 R_sun star with a period of P = 2.7536 days. The planet HAT-P-53b has a mass of 1.48 M_J and a radius of 1.32 R_J, and orbits a V = 13.7 mag, M = 1.09 M_sun, R = 1.21 R_sun star with a period of P = 1.9616 days. All four planets are consistent with having circular orbits and have masses and radii measured to better than 10% precision. The low stellar jitter and favorable R_P/R_star ratio for HAT-P-51 make it a promising target for measuring the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for a Saturn-mass planet.
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 8th June 2015, 5:06 am

New entry: HAT-P-56 b.

An inflated massive Hot Jupiter transiting a bright F star followed up with K2.0 observations

We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b by the HATNet survey, an inflated hot Jupiter transiting a bright F type star in Field 0 of NASA's K2 mission. We combine ground-based discovery and follow-up light curves with high precision photometry from K2, as well as ground-based radial velocities from TRES on the FLWO~1.5m telescope to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass of Mp≈2.18MJ, radius of Rp≈1.47RJ, and transits its host star on a near-grazing orbit with a period of P≈ 2.7908 d. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among the largest known for a planet with Mp>2MJ. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 10.9, mass of 1.30 M⊙, and radius of 1.43 R⊙. The periodogram of the K2 light curve suggests the star is a γ Dor variable. HAT-P-56b is an example of a ground-based discovery of a transiting planet, where space-based observations greatly improve the confidence in the confirmation of its planetary nature, and also improve the accuracy of the planetary parameters.
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Shellface on 8th June 2015, 10:10 am

Hey, this is one I remember studying at Planet Hunters, with only the K2 photometry. The star has a SIMBAD entry, a HD number and also a Hipparcos number. The faintness of the star makes the Hipparcos data pretty bad (the parallax is negative to 1 sigma, for example), but the proper motions seem alright.

It's good to see that the authors were able to detect the reflection effect. As far as I can tell, they don't actually give the implied albedo, though; given the amplitude of 21 7 ppm and their calculated system parameters, I get a geometric albedo of 0.0767 0.0295. This is similar to several other Hot Jupiters.

The authors also appear to assume that the large out-of-transit variability is due to pulsations. I suggest that they may be due to rotation; for the given values of the stellar radius and v sin i, a rotational period of 1.644 0.03 days gives sin i = 0.912 0.047, or a stellar inclination of 66 +8 -6 . Alternatively, a rotational period of 1.744 0.023 days gives sin i = 0.967 0.045, so i = 75 +15 -8 . The planetary inclination is 82.13 0.18 , so these rotational periods would indicate either slight star-planet misalignment or alignment, respectively. Observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect would be beneficial here; given the high rotational velocity, it would be large and possibly detectable.

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 12th June 2015, 4:19 am

Number 55!

HAT-P-55b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting a Sun-like Star

We report the discovery of a new transiting extrasolar planet, HAT-P-55b. The planet orbits a V = 13.207 +/- 0.039 sun-like star with a mass of 1.013 +/- 0.037 solar masses, a radius of 1.011 +/- 0.036 solar radii and a metallicity of -0.03 +/- 0.08. The planet itself is a typical hot Jupiter with a period of 3.5852467 +/- 0.0000064 days, a mass of 0.582 +/- 0.056 Jupiter masses and a radius of 1.182 +/- 0.055 Jupiter radii. This discovery adds to the increasing sample of transiting planets with measured bulk densities, which is needed to put constraints on models of planetary structure and formation theories.
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 30th October 2015, 4:41 am

A new hot Jupiter transiting an A-type star from HATNet Survey (host stars ha SWASP designation too, a WASP independent confirmation is not unlikely then)

HAT-P-57b: A Short-Period Giant Planet Transiting A Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography

We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V = 10.465 +- 0.029 mag, Teff = 7500 +- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v sin i = 102.1 +- 1.3 km s^-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R = 1.413 +- 0.054 R_J and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M < 1.85 M_J . Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47 +- 0.12 M_sun, and 1.500 +- 0.050 R_sun, respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P- 57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16.7 deg < lambda < 3.3 deg or 27.6 deg < lambda < 57.4 deg at 95% confidence, and with relative probabilities for the two modes of 26% and 74%, respectively. Adaptive optics imaging with MMT/Clio2 reveals an object located 2.7" from HAT-P-57 consisting of two point sources separated in turn from each other by 0.22". The H and L -band magnitudes of the companion stars are consistent with their being physically associated with HAT-P-57, in which case they are stars of mass 0.61 +- 0.10 M_sun and 0.53 +- 0.08 M_sun. HAT-P-57 is the most rapidly rotating star, and only the fourth main sequence A star, known to host a transiting planet.
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 15th June 2016, 9:07 pm

HAT-P-47b AND HAT-P-48b: Two Low Density Sub-Saturn-Mass Transiting Planets on the Edge of the Period--Mass Desert
http://arxiv.org/abs/1606.04556

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Edasich on 24th June 2016, 5:19 am

Stellar companions to HATNet and SuperWASP exoplanet hosts:

Friends of Hot Jupiters. IV. Stellar companions beyond 50 AU might facilitate giant planet formation, but most are unlikely to cause Kozai-Lidov migration
http://arxiv.org/abs/1606.07102v1
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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 11th September 2016, 8:15 pm

HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b: Two Transiting Inflated Hot Jupiters and Observational Evidence for the Re-Inflation of Close-In Giant Planets
http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02767

We present the discovery of the transiting exoplanets HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, with orbital periods of 2.6055 d and 2.9721 d, masses of 0.5270.083 MJ and 0.7830.057 MJ and inflated radii of 1.890.13 RJ and 1.59+0.16−0.10 RJ, respectively. They orbit moderately bright (V=13.1450.029, and V=12.9930.052) stars of mass 1.2120.050 M⊙ and 1.255+0.107−0.054 M⊙. The stars are at the main sequence turnoff. While it is well known that the radii of close-in giant planets are correlated with their equilibrium temperatures, whether or not the radii of planets increase in time as their hosts evolve and become more luminous is an open question. Looking at the broader sample of well-characterized close-in transiting giant planets, we find that there is a statistically significant correlation between planetary radii and the fractional ages of their host stars, with a false alarm probability of only 0.0041%. We find that the correlation between the radii of planets and the fractional ages of their hosts is fully explained by the known correlation between planetary radii and their present day equilibrium temperatures, however if the zero-age main sequence equilibrium temperature is used in place of the present day equilibrium temperature then a correlation with age must also be included to explain the planetary radii. This suggests that, after contracting during the pre-main-sequence, close-in giant planets are re-inflated over time due to the increasing level of irradiation received from their host stars. Prior theoretical work indicates that such a dynamic response to irradiation requires a significant fraction of the incident energy to be deposited deep within the planetary interiors.

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Re: HATnet Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 1st February 2017, 9:41 pm

That's a big one..

HAT-P-67b: An Extremely Low Density Saturn Transiting an F-Subgiant Confirmed via Doppler Tomography
https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.00106

We report the discovery of HAT-P-67b, a hot-Saturn transiting a rapidly rotating F-subgiant. HAT-P-67b has a radius of Rp = 2.085 -0.071/+0.096 RJ, orbiting a M* = 1.642 -0.072/+0.155 Msun, R* = 2.546 -0.084/+0.099 Rsun host star in a ~4.81-day period orbit. We place an upper limit on the mass of the planet via radial velocity measurements to be Mp < 0.59 MJ, and lower limit of > 0.056 MJ by limitations on Roche lobe overflow. Despite being a subgiant, the host star still exhibits relatively rapid rotation, with a projected rotational velocity of v sin I* = 35.8 +/- 1.1 km/s, making it difficult to precisely determine the mass of the planet using radial velocities. We validated HAT-P-67b via two Doppler tomographic detections of the planetary transit, which eliminated potential eclipsing binary blend scenarios. The Doppler tomographic observations also confirmed that HAT-P-67b has an orbit that is aligned, in projection, with the spin of its host star. Due to the large radius and low mass of HAT-P-67b, it is amongst the lowest density gas giants known.

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