Edasich's Work

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Sedna on 10th September 2009, 5:50 pm

Edasich wrote:
However, sorry for annoyance, but I just meant to add this requested and updated version of 2M 1207 b protoplanet.
I've still to find a way to get clear rocky bodies around the dust rings, but visible debris displayed seems work good, doesn't it?
I hope you like it.

Well, the person who requested person says that it's a very good work. On the case of the rings, it's better than I expected. The ordered outer rings with lots of dust and the spiral-shape inner ring showing the event with the Neptune-size planet. The planet itself is very good too, with this red glow showing the heat resulting from the collision. So, I congrad you Edasich.

Bye

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 5th October 2009, 5:37 am

Monday thread bump. Some updates:


33) - HD 38529's multiplanet system. Planet b, eccentric hot jupiter (I complain about grainy appearance due to image capture)...




...and Planet c, superjovian planet. With a dense ring of dust and particles.





34) Gamma Cephei Ab: roughly alike Whathmough's version.




35) PSR B1257+12's planetary system, the most famous pulsar planet system. Scaled by size.




36) And then an unconfirmed planetary object: SWEEPS-10. Star is an early M dwarf with an extremely close hot jupiter (1.24 Jupiter radii): 0.008 AUs. To be confirmed.




Zoomed view.




See you next update

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Stalker on 5th October 2009, 12:01 pm

why pulsar planets are so active?

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 6th October 2009, 3:51 am

Stalker wrote:why pulsar planets are so active?

Because of their young age (nearly 800 million years) and because of strong radiations from homepulsar that continuously stress planet's crust.


Last edited by Edasich on 6th October 2009, 6:40 am; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 6th October 2009, 4:17 am

How does the pulsar stress the planet's crusts?

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 6th October 2009, 6:42 am

Sirius_Alpha wrote:How does the pulsar stress the planet's crusts?

Edited. Typos make awful confusion sometimes.

Anyway once Lazarus said these planets might have re-accreted again from previously destroyed planet (If I remember correctly).
Assuming their accretion been quite recent, activity has got to be high.

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 6th October 2009, 8:48 am

I think that the PSR 1257+12 planets re-accreted from the debris from after the supernova, instead of a destroyed planet. I'm not entirely sure a supernova has the power to destroy a planet (assuming it's not a close-in planet).

And by the way, your gas planet textures are stunning.

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Lazarus on 6th October 2009, 3:19 pm

Edasich wrote:Anyway once Lazarus said these planets might have re-accreted again from previously destroyed planet (If I remember correctly)
I plead not guilty there... (though willing to change my mind if you find the URL ) problem with pre-supernova planets is that the mass loss in a supernova is a very good way of unbinding the system. Likeliest scenario is a supernova fallback disc.

Whether tidal heating would be an issue I don't know... it seems likely that all three planets are in synchronous rotation despite the relatively young age of the system (spindown age ~800 million years) - anyone got any references for a formula for quantifying tidal heating?

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 6th October 2009, 4:36 pm

OK, the one and only reason for planets' activity: Y.O.U.T.H!

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 6th October 2009, 8:49 pm

Lazarus wrote:Anyone got any references for a formula for quantifying tidal heating?



I don't recall where I got it though.

The heating flux through the planetary surface can simply be expressed as the tidal heating divided amongst the surface area of the planet.
h = H / 4*pi*R_planet^2

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 15th October 2009, 5:39 am

Forgive me for thread bumps, but I reckon this couple of pictures really deserve attention:


38) HD 49674 b: eccentric hot neptune in tight orbit.




39) HAT-P-2 b: eccentric hot super-jovian.




40) HD 43691 b: hot jupiter in eccentric orbit. Here night...




... and here the day side.




42) XO-5 b's eternal dawn.




The F5 type sun bakes the dark world for evermore...


43) And finally, since none (except me) can't know anything about this exoplanet candidate yet, I offer "fan service" for you : 30 Arietis Bb.









I can't anticipate anything, only show you the star is member of a hierarchically triple system (30 Ari Aa-Ab is the bright dot at planet's left) as pointed out back in 2007 (I think) in Santorini Meeting on Extrasolar Planets. If we consider the exoplanet candidate, the system turns out quadruple then.




See you next thread bump

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 15th October 2009, 11:20 am

Water-cloud Jovian in the habitable zone eh? Neat. Laughing

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 15th October 2009, 2:55 pm

Consider I had to generate the stellar system by myself. And Celestia stellar temperatures differs a bit from actual ones and modelling stellar radius and spectral types, planet temperatures aren't sometimes entirely correct.
The planet would be actually hotter and more massive.

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 20th October 2009, 11:50 am

Thread bump for GJ 667 C needed. Though I prefer call it "MLO 4 C" as at Solstation. They have also updated related page MLO 4

44) - My model for Gliese 667 Cb, super-Earth in tight orbit.:




Last edited by Edasich on 20th October 2009, 2:56 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 20th October 2009, 12:24 pm

I must have done the math wrong, but the planet I put in to Celestia had a much greater separation from the host star. I calculated a value of 0.051 AU, what's yours?

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 20th October 2009, 2:54 pm

Sirius_Alpha wrote:I must have done the math wrong, but the planet I put in to Celestia had a much greater separation from the host star. I calculated a value of 0.051 AU, what's yours?

Same, but an error was hiding in the script files...

Unreasonably the M-dwarf showed "1 Solar radius".

Gosh! It is not a protostar!

Fixed, anyway

And begging your pardon I'm adding Gliese 433.

45) Gliese 433 b, another hot super-earth.


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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 25th October 2009, 10:50 am

A little thread bump, I was bored


46) LRc01-E2-4295: topic readers are saying "WTH?". Even if I had typed CoRoT 10101123916, impression would have been the same.
So what is this?




According to Planetary transit candidates in CoRoT-LRc01 field it could be a "Corot-7 copycat":

This candidate has a low priority because it is faint, and there are marginal indications of a secondary in the light curve. The target star has an mV = 16.5, and a spectral type according to Exo-Dat of M0V. With a period of 1.13828d and a depth of the eclipse of 0.28% (duration 2.9 h), it could be a similar case to the CoRoT-7b super Earth (Léger et al. 2009). Photometry isplanned for this source in 2009 to discard a CEB scenario.

Hoping it is not a false positive or something else. Let's cross fingers.


47) OGLE-TR-10 and transiting exoplanet "Carystos": now I imagine NuclearVacuum giggling and blushing *lol*.




Serendipitously I've noticed the Lagoon Nebula (M8) painting OGLE-TR-10 exoplanet host firmament. Suggestive, ain't it?


48) HAT-P-11: transiting hot-neptune from HATNET, a Gliese 436 b's kin. Common name? Iphicles !


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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 25th October 2009, 10:37 pm

Hints of a secondary transit in the CoRoT candidate would hint that the candidate is of significant brightness compared to the host star. The secondary transits of super-Earths are probably not detectable with CoRoT, or even Kepler.

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 27th October 2009, 7:31 pm

It's been Edasich's birthday yesterday, but curiously it's Edasich making presents. This time non-exoplanetary stuff. Had fun with unusual planetary nebulas:

49) Planetary Nebula He 2-138: popped up on October 27 at ArXiv. Central star is very hot O subdwarf.




50) Waterfountain Nebula GLMP 480: randomly picked. Basd on IR reconstruction. Star is likely a dying late-M supergiant.



I hope you like it

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 3rd November 2009, 7:44 am

Little thread bump. I realized that saving Celestia snapshots as Portable Network Graphics (PNG) files, pictures look much neater than they do in common jpg files. Smile


51) Gliese 676 A and jovian kin "Eumon"




Putting coordinates into stc file for Celestia, you get the binary system being 3.62 light years away from another well-known exoplanet host, Mu Arae. Curious, ain't it?

Btw faint stellar components appear separated 758 AUs away each other. The red dot at planet's left is indeed GJ 676 B, a dim M3 dwarf.


52) Gliese 832 b: Another (cold) jovian around M dwarf.




53) NN Serpentis: WD+dM eclipsing binary...




... and their (putative) substellar/planetary companion




From parameters I've got in a previous paper about this system, I get a total luminosity of 0.044 LSolar. So water zone should be located nearly at 0.2 AUs.

See you next update Wink


Last edited by Edasich on 3rd November 2009, 3:17 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 3rd November 2009, 9:02 am

Nice textures again =). Yeah I've got to get around to putting Gliese 676 into Celestia. Close to Mu Arae eh? That's neat.

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by NuclearVacuum on 3rd November 2009, 12:44 pm

Edasich wrote:Little thread bump. I realized that saving Celestia snapshots as Portable Network Graphics (PNG) files, pictures look much neater than they do in common jpg files. Smile


51) Gliese 676 A and jovian kin "Eumon": I imagine Nuclearvacuum blushing. Laughing




Putting coordinates into stc file for Celestia, you get the binary system being 3.62 light years away from another well-known exoplanet host, Mu Arae. Curious, ain't it?

Btw faint stellar components appear separated 758 AUs away each other. The red dot at planet's left is indeed GJ 676 B, a dim M3 dwarf.


52) Gliese 832 b: Another (cold) jovian around M dwarf.




53) NN Serpentis: WD+dM eclipsing binary...




... and their (putative) substellar/planetary companion




From parameters I've got in a previous paper about this system, I get a total luminosity of 0.044 LSolar. So water zone should be located nearly at 0.2 AUs.

See you next update Wink

Why am I blushing?

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 3rd November 2009, 12:59 pm

Aren't you proud to see your exoplanetary names?

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by NuclearVacuum on 3rd November 2009, 1:04 pm

Edasich wrote:Aren't you proud to see your exoplanetary names?

My name? Those aren't my names, those are W. Lyra's names. In fact, the only planet name that he selected from my list that were were in sync with was Cronus for Iota Horologii b.

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Re: Edasich's Work

Post by Edasich on 3rd November 2009, 1:18 pm

*facepalm*

Doh!

If so Lyra has stolen me Nemea for GJ 436 (which now I call Phlegyas) Laughing

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Re: Edasich's Work

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