Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

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Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

Post by marasama on Tue Jun 16, 2009 4:19 pm

Back on the planet types. Like the types that should not be possible.
Examples are Chlorine-rich atmosphere or even fluoride-rich atmosphere.

So, what if they do exist? These chemicals are likely to combine with other chemicals, thus preventing free fluoride or chlorine in the atmosphere. But, the same could be said for oxygen.
That's right, maybe these planets exist with these atmosphere, cause primitive life did it the same as freeing the oxygen in Earth's atmosphere.

Anyhow, I was wanting to know what types of atmospheric chemicals we can come up with that should, technically, not form naturally.
The idea was from the thought that Earth may actually be a carbon-rich atmosphere Earth.
Cause, it is assumed that microbes freed up the oxygen. And also, the large deposit of oil (and other hydrocarbons) that if burned, would be enough to make a significant amount in the atmosphere to be considered carbon-rich atmosphere.
I can not find the hypothesis on this, but I remember reading it from somewhere.


Atmospheric Types that are likely caused by microbes:
0) Oxygen-rich? As in dioxygen, ozone, and free oxygen.
1) Chlorine-rich, on a planet that is before the snow-line.
2) Fluorine-rich.
3) Sulfur-rich gas species? (can someone verify this. Large amounts of sulfur in the atmosphere of a non-volcanic active world)
4) Hydrogensulfide-rich as a gas? (considering that the boiling point is at -60.28 C (212.87 K), wiki)
5) Methane-rich on hot worlds? (considering that methane is destroyed by sunlight, a planet rich with it in a closer orbit)
#) Rarer gas that are dominant on other worlds?


Last edited by marasama on Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:29 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

Post by Sirius_Alpha on Wed Jun 17, 2009 5:23 am

Pure oxygen atmospheres are found in the outer three Galilean moons. Their source is the photodissociation of water ice via sunlight.

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Re: Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

Post by NuclearVacuum on Wed Jun 17, 2009 9:25 am

It's a big universe. Its smart to keep an open mind I love you

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Re: Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

Post by marasama on Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:28 pm

Then, I guess an oxygen-rich atmosphere on cold words?

Also, I was mistaken, it was a carbon-rich atmosphere. Not a carbon-planet Earth.

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Re: Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

Post by Baltazar on Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:44 am

What about phosphorus-rich atmosphere?

Maybe a mix, nitrogen/phosphorus atmosphere?
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Re: Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

Post by Sirius_Alpha on Sat Jan 08, 2011 11:23 am

For a permanent atmosphere, wouldn't phosphorus settle out and fall to the surface?

In the Solar System, Mercury has some potassium in its atmosphere, but it's generated by sputtering. I believe the nitrogen would escape. Earth's Moon has similarly heavy elements in its atmosphere, formed the same way IIRC.

Is there a way a massive terrestrial body with a permanent atmosphere can get heavy elements in the air?

Edit: Evaporation.
Melting point 44.2 C (317.25 K), boiling point 280 C (553.15 K)
Uncomfortably hot planets might have phosphorus in its atmosphere.

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Re: Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

Post by Baltazar on Sat Jan 08, 2011 11:56 am

Sirius_Alpha wrote:For a permanent atmosphere, wouldn't phosphorus settle out and fall to the surface?

In the Solar System, Mercury has some potassium in its atmosphere, but it's generated by sputtering. I believe the nitrogen would escape. Earth's Moon has similarly heavy elements in its atmosphere, formed the same way IIRC.

Is there a way a massive terrestrial body with a permanent atmosphere can get heavy elements in the air?

Edit: Evaporation.
Melting point 44.2 C (317.25 K), boiling point 280 C (553.15 K)
Uncomfortably hot planets might have phosphorus in its atmosphere.

Well, I'm not that good in chemistry. I just gave it as an idea that the original poster might add to his list of planetary atmospheres.

I just based that on a fictional world that I created where the native life is nitrogen/phosphorus based. And the same elements being present in the atmosphere, accompanied with larger amounts of oxygen.

if there is another gas in the atmosphere, maybe CO2, I think it would keep the nitrogen? Again, not sure cuz I'm not that good in chemistry lol.
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Re: Planet classes that should not exist (but can)

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