Ocean Types

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Ocean Types

Post by marasama on 6th June 2009, 3:21 pm

Thought I list the types and see if I (we), can come up with scientifically valid reasons.

Molten:
1) molten metals
2) molten rocks
Warm:
1) salt water / alkaline metal ocean
2) iron-rich water, rust water
3) carbon-rich, which would be acidic
Cold:
1) liquid ammonia with water
2) liquid methane & ethane
3) liquid ammonia
4) liquid nitrogen

Note:
I did not include possible lifeforms. ie. Algae or bacterium growth. Even plants covering the surface of the ocean.
Hydrogen sulfide bacterium form pink colors. If they collect in gignormous numbers, could have pink oceans?

Also, this is just a generalization. Like Earth, at the bottom of the ocean in some parts, there are pools of molten sulfur.

Question on the rust water.
Could you have high concentrations of iron near the poles? Magnetic fields.

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 7th June 2009, 12:55 pm

Lazarus has said that Venus' atmosphere can be considered a supercritical CO_2 ocean.

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by Lazarus on 7th June 2009, 1:10 pm

I'm guessing marasama is talking liquid oceans, not supercritical fluids (or other exotics like metallic hydrogen or superionic water that are thought to exist in giant planets) though.

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by NuclearVacuum on 7th June 2009, 4:43 pm

This is very funny, I was just about to ask this question, but you already answered me. Anyway, I was going to ask more about the the possibility of hydrochloric oceans.

I also wanted to ask whether about complex and intelligent life. What is the likelyhood of either forming on a non-water based planet?

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by marasama on 8th June 2009, 11:46 pm

Hydrochloric Acid Oceans is possible. But I think it would have to be in the cold-earth analogs. Cause sunlight does a number on the chemical.

According to Wikipedia.
110 C (383 K), 20.2% solution.
48 C (321 K), 38% solution.

Sulfuric Acid on the other hand is at a higher temp.
But problems with acids is that they will corrode the land.
So, maybe concentration amounts is the answer, where the shoreline is more alkaline and the oceans are more acidic.

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by marasama on 8th June 2009, 11:47 pm

Yeah, I did not account for supercritical fluids.

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by NuclearVacuum on 10th June 2009, 11:24 am

marasama wrote:Hydrochloric Acid Oceans is possible. But I think it would have to be in the cold-earth analogs. Cause sunlight does a number on the chemical.

The fact that chlorine planets orbit in the outer part of the habitable zone seems to be accurate. I found an article that explains chlorine worlds in great detail. Stating that:

Most often, a chlorine world is formed at the outer edges of a system's life zone, or even outside it. As the star ages and warms, or as the dynamic between the interplanetary material and the planets brings orbits closer to the primary, a chlorine world becomes possible.

but that

Most are extremely hot due to greenhouse effects (daytime temperatures of 30 to 50 Celsius are typical).

So you can see how I mistook how these worlds could be hot.

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by The Kiat on 26th April 2010, 6:46 pm

Here's something from my own World Classification concerning Ocean Worlds.





Class F (Ocean) more than 50% of its surface covered by ocean.

F1) Ocean (Metal) The best way to describe an F1 is that it is a planet in the process of forming. During the formation of systems, continuous impacts from asteroids and even other planets leave forming worlds in a liquid state. There are no F1 planets older than a few million years; by then, the planet solidifies and turns into something else.

F2) Ocean (Silicate) It is a planet with an ocean of liquid glass. For the most part, it is in the same category as an F1, only existing during planetary formation. However, for reasons not fully understood, Dakar is an F2, perhaps due to a planetary collision.

F3) Ocean (Water) Does this really need explanation? It is the fabled earth-like planet.

F4) Ocean (Ammonia) A world with an ocean of liquid ammonia. Because ammonia has properties similar to water, F4 worlds are capable of developing life. Due to the cold temperatures ammonia exists at a liquid, F4 life will always be slower than F3 life.

F5) Ocean (Methane) A world where methane exists in a liquid form. Titan would be classified as F5, even if more than 50% of its surface is not under methane.

F6) Ocean (Nitrogen) A world so cold that its oceans are comprised of liquid nitrogen. Such worlds are rare.

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by AVBursch on 26th April 2010, 7:28 pm

COROT-7b would be an example of an F2, as it is hot enough from stellar insolation to have oceans of lava. Other examples include Gliese 876d, 55 Cancri e, and HD 40307b.

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Re: Ocean Types

Post by marasama on 13th July 2010, 2:56 pm


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Re: Ocean Types

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