ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

View previous topic View next topic Go down

ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 4:17 pm

Hello all, this is my fist post to this board, which I found out about just recently. Being interested in exoplanets, I have been keeping a list of ARXIV papers concerning them, which currently contains more than 800 titles. It seems likely to me that others might be interested in these papers as well, so I would like to start presenting titles from that list here, sorted by topic. To begin with, here is the list of papers related to Earthlike exoplanets. Once I get some feedback, including if you think that this is a good idea or not, I would be willing to continue with lists sorted by other topics. If anybody has suggestions for topics of interest, I would be glad to hear them.

(I am splitting the lists into sections containing around 10 papers, in order to avoid choking the server.)

Bill

Earthlike exoplanets

2001

Could We Detect Molecular Oxygen in the Atmosphere of a Transiting Extra-Solar Earth-Like Planet?

John K. Webb, Imma Wormleaton

Although the extra-solar planets discovered so far are of the giant, gaseous, type, the increased sensitivity of future surveys will result in the discovery of lower mass planets. The detection of O2 in the atmosphere of a rocky extra-solar planet would be a potential indicator of a life. In this paper we address the specific issue of whether we would be able to detect the O2 A-band absorption feature in the atmosphere of a planet similar to the Earth, if it were in orbit around a nearby star. Our method is empirical, in that we use observations of the Earth's O2 A-band, with a simple geometric modification for a transiting extra-solar planet, allowing for limb-darkening of the host star. We simulate the spectrum of the host star with the superposed O2 A-band absorption of the transiting planet, assuming a spectral resolution of 7 km/s (typical of current echelle spectrographs), for a range of spectral signal-to-noise ratios. The main result is that we could reliably detect the O2 A-band of the transiting planet for host stars with radii 0.3 solar or less. However, using existing instrumentation and 8m telescopes, this requires target M stars with m(V) of approximately 10 or brighter for integration times of about 10 hours or less. The number of such stars over the sky is small. Larger aperture telescopes and/or improved instrumentation efficiency would enable surveys of M stars down to m(V) = 13 and greatly improve the chances of discovering life elsewhere.

Cosmological Constraints on Terrestrial Planet Formation

Charles H. Lineweaver

I attempt to piece together a consistent scenario based on current estimates of the evolution of the star formation rate of the Universe, the metallicity evolution of the star-forming regions of the Universe and the most recent observations of extrasolar planets. The precision of all of these data sets is improving rapidly, but they can already be combined to yield an estimate of the age distribution of earth-like planets in the Universe.

The Galactic Habitable Zone I. Galactic Chemical Evolution

Guillermo Gonzalez, Donald Brownlee, Peter Ward

We propose the concept of a "Galactic Habitable Zone" (GHZ). Analogous to the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ), the GHZ is that region in the Milky Way where an Earth-like planet can retain liquid water on its surface and provide a long-term habitat for animal-like aerobic life. In this paper we examine the dependence of the GHZ on Galactic chemical evolution. The single most important factor is likely the dependence of terrestrial planet mass on the metallicity of its birth cloud. We estimate, very approximately, that a metallicity at least half that of the Sun is required to build a habitable terrestrial planet. The mass of a terrestrial planet has important consequences for interior heat loss, volatile inventory, and loss of atmosphere. A key issue is the production of planets that sustain plate tectonics, a critical recycling process that provides feedback to stabilize atmospheric temperatures on planets with oceans and atmospheres. Due to the more recent decline from the early intense star formation activity in the Milky Way, the concentration in the interstellar medium of the geophysically important radioisotopes, {40}K, {235, 238}U, {232}Th, has been declining relative to Fe, an abundant element in the Earth. Also likely important are the relative abundances of Si and Mg to Fe, which affects the mass of the core relative to the mantle in a terrestrial planet. All these elements and isotopes vary with time and location in the Milky Way; thus, planetary systems forming in other locations and times in the Milky Way with the same metallicity as the Sun will not necessarily form habitable Earth-like planets.

2002

The Spectrum of Earthshine: A Pale Blue Dot Observed from the Ground

N. J. Woolf, P. S. Smith, W. A. Traub, K. W. Jucks

We report the visible reflection spectrum of the integrated Earth, illuminated as it would be seen as an spatially-unresolved extrasolar planet. The spectrum was derived from observation of lunar earthshine in the range 4800 to 9200 Angstrom at a spectral resolution of about 600. We observe absorption features of ozone, molecular oxygen and water. We see enhanced reflectivity at short wavelengths from Rayleigh scattering, and apparently negligible contributions from aerosol and ocean water scattering. We also see enhanced reflectivity at long wavelengths starting at about 7300 Angstrom, corresponding to the well-known red reflectivity edge of vegetation due to its chlorophyll content; however this signal is not conclusive, due to the breakdown of our simple model at wavelengths beyond 7900 Angstrom.

A Possible Aeronomy of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

W. A. Traub, K. W. Jucks

Terrestrial planetary systems may exist around nearby stars as the Earth-sized counterparts to the many giant planets already discovered within the solar neighborhood. In this chapter we first discuss the numerous techniques which have been suggested to search for extrasolar terrestrial planets. We then focus on the expected results from that technique in which an orbiting telescope or interferometer is used to obtain a visible or infrared spectrum of a planet, without contamination from the parent star. We show examples of such spectra for selected cases: the present Earth, the Neoproterozoic (snowball) Earth, a methane-rich Earth, and the present Mars and Venus. We conclude by discussing the implications of such spectra for the detection of life on an extrasolar terrestrial planet.

A test for the search for life on extrasolar planets: Looking for the terrestrial vegetation signature in the Earthshine spectrum

L. Arnold, S. Gillet, O. Lardiere, P. Riaud, J. Schneider

We report spectroscopic observations (400 to 800nm, R = approx 100) of Earthshine in June, July and October 2001 from which normalised Earth albedo spectra have been derived. The resulting spectra clearly show the blue colour of the Earth due to Rayleigh diffusion in its atmosphere. They also show the signatures of oxygen, ozone and water vapour. We tried to extract from these spectra the signature of Earth vegetation. A variable signal (4 to 10 +/-3%) around 700nm has been measured in the Earth albedo. It is interpreted as being due to the vegetation red edge, expected to be between 2 to 10% of the Earth albedo at 700nm, depending on models. We discuss the primary goal of the present observations: their application to the detection of vegetation-like biosignatures on extrasolar planets.

A Model of the Temporal Variability of Optical Light from Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

Eric B. Ford, Sara Seager, Edwin L. Turner

The light scattered by an extrasolar Earth-like planet's surface and atmosphere will vary in intensity and color as the planet rotates; the resulting light curve will contain information about the planet's properties. Since most of the light comes from a small fraction of the planet's surface, the temporal flux variability can be quite significant, 10-100%. In addition, for cloudless Earth-like extrasolar planet models, qualitative changes to the surface (such as ocean fraction, ice cover) significantly affect the light curve. Clouds dominate the temporal variability of the Earth but can be coherent over several days. In contrast to Earth's temporal variability, a uniformly, heavily clouded planet (e.g. Venus), would show almost no flux variability. We present light curves for an unresolved Earth and for Earth-like model planets calculated by changing the surface features. This work suggests that meteorological variability and the rotation period of an Earth-like planet could be derived from photometric observations. The inverse problem of deriving surface properties from a given light curve is complex and will require much more investigation.


Last edited by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 5:33 pm; edited 2 times in total
avatar
Mongo
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 58
Age : 55
Location : Greater Toronto, Canada
Registration date : 2009-05-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 4:19 pm

part 2 of this list:

2003

Volatile-Rich Earth-Mass Planets in the Habitable Zone

Marc J. Kuchner

A small planet is not necessarily a terrestrial planet. Planets that form beyond the snow line with too little mass to seed rapid gas accretion (<~ 10 Earth masses) should be rich in volatile ices like water and ammonia. Some of these planets should migrate inward by interacting with a circumstellar disk or with other planets. Such objects can retain their volatiles for billions of years or longer at ~1 AU as their atmospheres undergo slow hydrodynamic escape. These objects could appear in future surveys for extrasolar Earth analogs.

Making other Earths: Dynamical Simulations of Terrestrial Planet Formation and Water Delivery

Sean N. Raymond, Thomas R. Quinn, Jonathan I. Lunine

We present results from 42 simulations of late stage planetary accretion, focusing on the delivery of volatiles (primarily water) to the terrestrial planets. Our simulations include both planetary "embryos" (defined as Moon to Mars sized protoplanets) and planetesimals, assuming that the embryos formed via oligarchic growth. We investigate volatile delivery as a function of Jupiter's mass, position and eccentricity, the position of the snow line, and the density (in solids) of the solar nebula.

In all simulations, we form 1-4 terrestrial planets inside 2 AU, which vary in mass and volatile content. In 42 simulations we have formed 43 planets between 0.8 and 1.5 AU, including 11 "habitable" planets between 0.9 and 1.1 AU. These planets range from dry worlds to "water worlds" with 100+ oceans of water (1 ocean = 1.5x10^24 g), and vary in mass between 0.23 and 3.85 Earth masses.

There is a good deal of stochastic noise in these simulations, but the most important parameter is the planetesimal mass we choose, which reflects the surface density in solids past the snow line. A high density in this region results in the formation of a smaller number of terrestrial planets with larger masses and higher water content, as compared with planets which form in systems with lower densities.

We find that an eccentric Jupiter produces drier terrestrial planets with higher eccentricities than a circular one. In cases with Jupiter at 7 AU, we form what we call "super embryos," 1-2 Earth mass protoplanets which can serve as the accretion seeds for 2+ Earth mass planets with large water contents.


A New Family of Planets ? "Ocean Planets"

A.Leger, F.Selsis, C.Sotin, T.Guillot, D.Despois, H.Lammer, M.Ollivier, F.Brachet, A.Labeque, C.Valette

A new family of planets is considered which is between rocky terrestrial planets and gaseous giant ones: "Ocean-Planets". We present the possible formation, composition and internal models of these putative planets, including that of their ocean, as well as their possible Exobiology interest. These planets should be detectable by planet detection missions such as Eddington and Kepler, and possibly COROT (launch scheduled in 2006). They would be ideal targets for spectroscopic missions such as Darwin/TPF.

2004

The Galactic Habitable Zone and the Age Distribution of Complex Life in the Milky Way

Charles H. Lineweaver, Yeshe Fenner, Brad K. Gibson

[i]We modeled the evolution of the Milky Way to trace the distribution in space and time of four prerequisites for complex life: the presence of a host star, enough heavy elements to form terrestrial planets, sufficient time for biological evolution and an environment free of life-extinguishing supernovae. We identified the Galactic habitable zone (GHZ) as an annular region between 7 and 9 kiloparsecs from the Galactic center that widens with time and is composed of stars that formed between 8 and 4 billion years ago. This GHZ yields an age distribution for the complex life that may inhabit our Galaxy. We found that 75% of the stars in the GHZ are older than the Sun.


An observational signature of evolved oceans on extra-solar terrestrial planets

M. Jura

The increase in luminosity with time of a main sequence star eventually can lead to substantial evaporation of the oceans on an orbiting terrestrial planet. Subsequently, the gas phase water in the planet's upper atmosphere can be photodissociated by stellar ultraviolet and the resulting atomic hydrogen then may be lost in a wind. This gaseous envelope may pass in front of the host star and produce tansient, detectable ultraviolet absorption in the Lyman lines in systems older than 1 Gyr.

The formation and habitability of terrestrial planets in the presence of hot jupiters

Sean N. Raymond, Thomas Quinn, Jonathan I. Lunine

`Hot jupiters,' giant planets with orbits very close to their parent stars, are thought to form farther away and migrate inward via interactions with a massive gas disk. If a giant planet forms and migrates quickly, the planetesimal population has time to re-generate in the lifetime of the disk and terrestrial planets may form (Armitage 2003). We present results of simulations of terrestrial planet formation in the presence of hot jupiters, broadly defined as having orbital radii <= 0.5 AU. We show that terrestrial planets similar to those in the Solar System can form around stars with hot jupiters, and can have water contents equal to or higher than the Earth's. For small orbital radii of hot jupiters (e.g. 0.15, 0.25 AU) potentially habitable planets can form, but for semi-major axes of 0.5 AU or greater their formation is suppressed. We show that the presence of an outer giant planet such as Jupiter does not enhance the water content of the terrestrial planets, but rather decreases their formation and water delivery timescales. We speculate that asteroid belts may exist interior to the terrestrial planets in systems with hot jupiters.

Ozone Abundance in a Nitrogen-Carbon Dioxide Dominated Terrestrial Paleoatmosphere

B.C. Thomas, A.L. Melott, L.D. Martin, C.H. Jackman

We compute the ozone distribution for a model terrestrial paleoatmosphere in which the present oxygen abundance is largely replaced by carbon dioxide, which we argue is a reasonable working assumption. In principle, the presence of carbon dioxide might supplement the ozone shield as compared with models based on nitrogen without high carbon dioxide abundance so that early life need not have been as UV-resistant as often assumed. An extrasolar planet with a high-CO2 atmosphere might contain enough O3 to be a source of false positive biomarkers. We find that the globally averaged O3 column density can be the same, or nearly four times higher (depending upon the O2 partial pressure) when CO2 is used in place of N2 as the replacement component for lowered O2 in a 1-atm terrestrial planet with solar radiation. The effect is important for making quantitative deductions from future data, but does not invalidate the use of O3 as a biomarker for free oxygen. These results make prospects for detection of extrasolar planetary O3 absorption somewhat better than before.

The Use of Transit Timing to Detect Extrasolar Planets with Masses as Small as Earth

Matthew J. Holman, Norman W. Murray

Future surveys for transiting extrasolar planets, including the space-based mission Kepler (Borucki et al 2003), are expected to detect hundreds of Jovian mass planets and tens of terrestrial mass planets. For many of these newly discovered planets, the intervals between successive transits will be measured with an accuracy of 0.1--100 minutes. We show that these timing measurements will allow for the detection of additional planets in the system (not necessarily transiting), via their gravitational interaction with the transiting planet. The transit time variations depend on the mass of the additional planet, and in some cases Earth-mass planets will produce a measurable effect.
avatar
Mongo
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 58
Age : 55
Location : Greater Toronto, Canada
Registration date : 2009-05-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 4:21 pm

part 3 of this list:

2005

The transmission spectrum of Earth-size transiting planets

David Ehrenreich, Giovanna Tinetti, Alain Lecavelier Des Etangs, Alfred Vidal-Madjar, Franck Selsis

A variety of terrestrial planets with different physical parameters and exotic atmospheres might plausibly exist outside our Solar System, waiting to be detected by the next generation of space-exploration missions. Some of these planets might transit their parent star. We present here the first study of atmospheric signatures of transiting Earth-size exoplanets. We focus on a limited number of significant examples, for which we discuss the detectability of some of the possible molecules present in their atmospheres, such as water, carbon dioxide, ozone or molecular oxygen. To this purpose, we developed a model to simulate transmission spectra of Earth-size exoplanets from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. According to our calculations, the signatures of planetary atmospheres represent an absorption of a few parts-per-million (ppm) in the stellar flux. The atmospheres of a few Earth-like planets can be detected with a 30-40m telescope. The detection of the extensive atmospheres of tens of small satellites of giant exoplanets and hundreds of hypothetical ocean-planets can be achieved with 20-30m and 10-20m instruments, respectively, provided all these planets are frequent and they are efficiently surveyed. We also found that planets around K stars are favored, mainly because these stars are more numerous and they are smaller compared to G or F stars. While not addressed in this study, limitations might come from the stellar photometric micro-variability.

Biosignatures from Earth-Like Planets Around M Dwarfs

Antigona Segura, James F. Kasting, Victoria Meadows, Martin Cohen, John Scalo, David Crisp, Rebecca A.H. Butler, Giovana Tinetti

Coupled one-dimensional photochemical-climate calculations have been performed for hypothetical Earth-like planets around M dwarfs. Visible, near-infrared and thermal-infrared synthetic spectra of these planets were generated to determine which biosignature gases might be observed by a future, space-based telescope. Our star sample included two observed active M dwarfs, AD Leo and GJ 643, and three quiescent model stars. The spectral distribution of these stars in the ultraviolet generates a different photochemistry on these planets. As a result, the biogenic gases CH4, N2O, and CH3Cl have substantially longer lifetimes and higher mixing ratios than on Earth, making them potentially observable by space-based telescopes. On the active M-star planets, an ozone layer similar to Earth's was developed that resulted in a spectroscopic signature comparable to the terrestrial one. The simultaneous detection of O2 (or O3) and a reduced gas in a planet's atmosphere has been suggested as strong evidence for life. Planets circling M stars may be good locations to search for such evidence.

High-resolution simulations of the final assembly of Earth-like planets 1: terrestrial accretion and dynamics

Sean N. Raymond, Thomas Quinn, Jonathan I. Lunine

The final stage in the formation of terrestrial planets consists of the accumulation of ~1000-km ``planetary embryos'' and a swarm of billions of 1-10 km ``planetesimals.'' During this process, water-rich material is accreted by the terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies from beyond roughly 2.5 AU. We present results from five high-resolution dynamical simulations. These start from 1000-2000 embryos and planetesimals, roughly 5-10 times more particles than in previous simulations.

Each simulation formed 2-4 terrestrial planets with masses between 0.4 and 2.6 Earth masses. The eccentricities of most planets were ~0.05, lower than in previous simulations, but still higher than for Venus, Earth and Mars. Each planet accreted at least the Earth's current water budget.

We demonstrate several new aspects of the accretion process: 1) The feeding zones of terrestrial planets change in time, widening and moving outward. Even in the presence of Jupiter, water-rich material from beyond 2.5 AU is not accreted for several millions of years. 2) Even in the absence of secular resonances, the asteroid belt is cleared of >99% of its original mass by self-scattering of bodies into resonances with Jupiter. 3) If planetary embryos form relatively slowly, following the models of Kokubo & Ida, then the formation of embryos in the asteroid belt may have been stunted by the presence of Jupiter. 4) Self-interacting planetesimals feel dynamical friction from other small bodies, which has important effects on the eccentricity evolution and outcome of a simulation.


High-resolution simulations of the final assembly of Earth-like planets 2: water delivery and planetary habitability

Sean N. Raymond, Thomas Quinn, Jonathan I. Lunine

The water content and habitability of terrestrial planets are determined during their final assembly, from ~1000-km ``planetary embryos'' and a swarm of billions of 1-10 km ``planetesimals.'' During this process, water-rich material is accreted by terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies originating beyond roughly 2.5 AU. We present analysis of water delivery and habitability in five high-resolution simulations of terrestrial accretion first described in Raymond, Quinn & Lunine (2006).

In five simulations, we have formed a total of 15 terrestrial planets, including five potentially habitable planets. Each simulation formed 2-4 planets with masses from 0.4 to 2.6 Earth masses. Every planet from each simulation accreted at least the Earth's current water budget; most accreted several times that amount (assuming no impact depletion). Each planet accreted at least five water-rich embryos and planetesimals from past 2.5 AU; most accreted 10-20 water-rich bodies. We show that the process of water delivery to Earth-like planets is less stochastic than previously thought. Terrestrial planets accrete a large number of water-rich planetesimals in a statistically robust way, and a few water-rich embryos in a stochastic, ``hit or miss'' process.

In one interesting case, two ~Earth-mass, potentially habitable planets formed in one system, at the inner and outer edges of the habitable zone. The eccentricities of both planets oscillate out of phase, with amplitudes of ~0.2. At certain times, their eccentric orbits cause each planet's orbit to venture either interioror exterior to the habitable zone.


Internal Structure of Massive Terrestrial Planets

Diana Valencia, Richard J. O'Connell, Dimitar D. Sasselov

Planetary formation models predict the existence of massive terrestrial planets and experiments are now being designed that should succeed in discovering them and measuring their masses and radii. We calculate internal structures of planets with one to ten times the mass of the Earth (Super-Earths) in order to obtain scaling laws for total radius, mantle thickness, core size and average density as a function of mass. We explore different compositions and obtain a scaling law of $R\propto M^{0.267-0.272}$ for Super-Earths. We also study a second family of planets, Super-Mercuries with masses ranging from one mercury-mass to ten mercury-masses with similar composition to the Earth's but larger core mass fraction. We explore the effect of surface temperature and core mass fraction on the scaling laws for these planets. The scaling law obtained for the Super-Mercuries is $R\propto M^{\sim0.3}$.
avatar
Mongo
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 58
Age : 55
Location : Greater Toronto, Canada
Registration date : 2009-05-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 4:39 pm

part 4 of this list:

2006

The potential for tidally heated icy and temperate moons around exoplanets

Caleb A. Scharf

Moons of giant planets may represent an alternative to the classical picture of habitable worlds. They may exist within the circumstellar habitable zone of a parent star, and through tidal energy dissipation they may also offer alternative habitable zones, where stellar insolation plays a secondary, or complementary, role. We investigate the potential extent of stable satellite orbits around a set of 74 known extrasolar giant planets located beyond 0.6 AU from their parent stars - where moons should be long-lived with respect to removal by stellar tides. Approximately 60\% of these giant planets can sustain satellites or moons in bands up to $\sim 0.04$ AU in width. For comparison, the Galiean satellites extend to $\sim 0.013$ AU. We investigate the stellar insolation that moons would experience for these exoplanet systems, and the implications for sublimation loss of volatiles. We find that between 15 and 27\% of {\em all} known exoplanets may be capable of harboring small, icy, moons. In addition, some 22-28\% of all known exoplanets could harbor moons within a ``sublimation zone'', with insolation temperatures between 273 K and 170 K. A simplified energy balance model is applied to the situation of temperate moons, maintained by a combination of stellar insolation and tidal heat flow. We demonstrate that large moons ($>0.1 $M$_{\oplus}$), at orbital radii commensurate with those of the Galilean satellites, could maintain temperate, or habitable, surface conditions during episodes of tidal heat dissipation of the order 1-100 times that currently seen on Io.

Constraints on the mass of a habitable planet with water of nebular origin

Masahiro Ikoma, Hidenori Genda

From an astrobiological point of view, special attention has been paid to the probability of habitable planets in extrasolar systems. The purpose of this study is to constrain a possible range of the mass of a terrestrial planet that can get water. We focus on the process of water production through oxidation of the atmospheric hydrogen--the nebular gas having been attracted gravitationally--by oxide available at the planetary surface. For the water production to work well on a planet, a sufficient amount of hydrogen and enough high temperature to melt the planetary surface are needed. We have simulated the structure of the atmosphere that connects with the protoplanetary nebula for wide ranges of heat flux, opacity, and density of the nebular gas. We have found both requirements are fulfilled for an Earth-mass planet for wide ranges of the parameters. We have also found the surface temperature of planets of <= 0.3 Earth masses is lower than the melting temperature of silicate (~ 1500K). On the other hand, a planet of more than several Earth masses becomes a gas giant planet through runaway accretion of the nebular gas.

Spectral Evolution of an Earth-Like Planet

L. Kaltenegger, W.A. Traub, K.W. Jucks

We have developed a characterization of the geological evolution of the Earths atmosphere and surface in order to model the observable spectra of an Earth-like planet through its geological history. These calculations are designed to guide the interpretation of an observed spectrum of such a planet by future instruments that will characterize exoplanets. Our models focus on spectral features that either imply habitability or are required for habitability. These features are generated by H2O, CO2, CH4, O2, O3, N2O, and vegetation-like surface albedos. We chose six geological epochs to characterize. These epochs exhibit a wide range in abundance for these molecules, ranging from a CO2 rich early atmosphere, to a CO2/CH4-rich atmosphere around 2 billion years ago to a present-day atmosphere. We analyzed the spectra to quantify the strength of each important spectral feature in both the visible and thermal infrared spectral regions, and the resolutions required to unambiguously observe the features for each epoch. We find a wide range of spectral resolutions required for observing the different features. For example, H2O and O3 can be observed with relatively low resolution, while O2 and N2O require higher resolution. We also find that the inclusion of clouds in our models significantly affects both the strengths and resolutions required to observe all spectral features.

A Re-appraisal of the Habitability of Planets Around M Dwarf Stars

Jill C. Tarter, Peter R. Backus, Rocco L. Mancinelli, Jonathan M. Aurnou, Dana E. Backman, Gibor S. Basri, Alan P. Boss, Andrew Clarke, Drake Deming, Laurance R. Doyle, Eric D. Feigelson, Friedmann Freund, David H. Grinspoon, Robert M. Haberle, Steven A. Hauck II, Martin J. Heath, Todd J. Henry, Jeffery L. Hollingsworth, Manoj M. Joshi, Steven Kilston, Michael C. Liu, Eric Meikle, I. Neill Reid, Lynn J. Rothschild, John M. Scalo, Antigona Segura, Carol M. Tang, James M. Tiedje, Margaret C. Turnbull, Lucianne M. Walkowicz, Arthur L. Weber, Richard E. Young

Stable, hydrogen-burning, M dwarf stars comprise about 75% of all stars in the Galaxy. They are extremely long-lived and because they are much smaller in mass than the Sun (between 0.5 and 0.08 MSun), their temperature and stellar luminosity are low and peaked in the red. We have re-examined what is known at present about the potential for a terrestrial planet forming within, or migrating into, the classic liquid-surface-water habitable zone close to an M dwarf star. Observations of protoplanetary disks suggest that planet-building materials are common around M dwarfs, but N-body simulations differ in their estimations of the likelihood of potentially-habitable, wet planets residing within their habitable zones, which are only ~ 1/5 to 1/50 of the width of that for a G star. Particularly in light of the claimed detection of the planets with masses as small as 5.5 and 7.5 MEarth orbiting M stars, there seems no reason to exclude the possibility of terrestrial planets. Tidally locked synchronous rotation within the narrow habitable zone doesn't necessarily lead to atmospheric collapse, and active stellar flaring may not be as much of an evolutionarily disadvantageous factor as has previously been supposed. We conclude that M dwarf stars may indeed be viable hosts for planets on which the origin and evolution of life can occur. A number of planetary processes such as cessation of geothermal activity, or thermal and non-thermal atmospheric loss processes may limit the duration of planetary habitability to periods far shorter than the extreme lifetime of the M dwarf star. Nevertheless, it makes sense to include M dwarf stars in programs that seek to find habitable worlds and evidence of life.

Using long-term transit timing to detect terrestrial planets

Jeremy S. Heyl, Brett J. Gladman

We propose that the presence of additional planets in extrasolar planetary systems can be detected by long-term transit timing studies. If a transiting planet is on an eccentric orbit then the presence of another planet causes a secular advance of the transiting planet's pericenter over and above the effect of general relativity. Although this secular effect is impractical to detect over a small number of orbits, it causes long-term differences in when future transits occur, much like the long-term decay observed in pulsars. Measuring this transit-timing delay would thus allow the detection of either one or more additional planets in the system or the first measurements of non-zero oblateness ($J_2$) of the central stars.

On the formation of terrestrial planets in hot-Jupiter systems

Martyn J. Fogg, Richard P. Nelson

We present a series of calculations aimed at examining how an inner system of planetesimals/protoplanets, undergoing terrestrial planet formation, evolves under the influence of a giant planet undergoing inward type II migration through the region bounded between 5 - 0.1 AU. We find that > 60% of the solids disk survives by being scattered by the giant planet into external orbits. Planetesimals are scattered outward almost as efficiently as protoplanets, resulting in the regeneration of a solids disk where dynamical friction is strong and terrestrial planet formation is able to resume. A simulation extended for a few Myr after the migration of the giant planet halted at 0.1 AU, resulted in an apparently stable planet of ~ 2 Earth masses forming in the habitable zone. Migration-induced mixing of volatile-rich material from beyond the `snowline' into the inner disk regions means that terrestrial planets that form there are likely to be water-rich. We predict that hot--Jupiter systems are likely to harbor water-rich terrestrial planets in their habitable zones. These planets may be detected by future planet search missions.

The Response of Atmospheric Chemistry on Earthlike Planets around F, G and K Stars to Small Variations in Orbital Distance

One of the prime goals of future investigations of extrasolar planets is to search for life as we know it. The Earth's biosphere is adapted to current conditions. How would the atmospheric chemistry of the Earth respond if we moved it to different orbital distances or changed its host star? This question is central to astrobiology and aids our understanding of how the atmospheres of terrestrial planets develop. To help address this question, we have performed a sensitivity study using a coupled radiative-convective photochemical column model to calculate changes in atmospheric chemistry on a planet having Earth's atmospheric composition, which we subjected to small changes in orbital position, of the order of 5-10 per cent for a solar-type G2V, F2V, and K2V star. We then applied a chemical source-sink analysis to the biomarkers in order to understand how chemical processes affect biomarker concentrations. We start with the composition of the present Earth, since this is the only example we know for which a spectrum of biomarker molecules has been measured. We then investigate the response of the biomarkers to changes in the input stellar flux. Computing the thermal profile for atmospheres rich in H2 O, CO2 and CH4 is however a major challenge for current radiative schemes, due, among other things, to lacking spectroscopic data. Therefore, as a first step, we employ a more moderate approach, by investigating small shifts in planet-star distance and assuming an earthlike biosphere. To calculate this shift we assumed a criteria for complex life based on the Earth, i.e. the earthlike planetary surface temperature varied between zero to thirty degrees Centigrade which led to a narrow HZ width of (0.94-1.08).

Obliquity evolution of extrasolar terrestrial planets

Keiko Atobe, Shigeru Ida

We have investigated the obliquity evolution of terrestrial planets in habitable zones (at ~ 1AU) in extrasolar planetary systems, due to tidal interactions with their satellite and host star with wide varieties of satellite-to-planet mass ratio and initial obliquity, through numerical calculations and analytical arguments. The obliquity, the angle between planetary spin axis and its orbit normal, of a terrestrial planet is one of the key factors in determining the planetary surface environments. A recent scenario of terrestrial planet accretion implies that giant impacts of Mars-sized bodies determine the planetary spin and form satellites. With isotropic giant impacts, tilted spins are more likely to be produced than straight ones and satellites with various mass are formed. However, most of previous studies have focused on a particular case of the Earth-Moon systems or the two-body planar problem. We numerically integrated the evolution of planetary spin and a satellite orbit with various satellite mass and initial obliquity. We found that in the case of initially tiled spins, the satellite's orbit migrates outward until the orbit reaches the critical radius ~ 10-20 planetary radii, but then the migration is reversed to inward one with large-amplitude oscillation. The satellite eventually falls onto the planetary surface or it is captured at the synchronous state at several planetary radii. With the results of numerical integration and analytical arguments, we identified the parameter regions of qualitatively different evolution.


Last edited by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 5:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
avatar
Mongo
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 58
Age : 55
Location : Greater Toronto, Canada
Registration date : 2009-05-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 4:58 pm

part 5 of this list

2007

Spectral signatures of photosynthesis I: Review of Earth organisms

Nancy Y. Kiang, Janet Siefert, Govindjee, Robert E. Blankenship

Why do plants reflect in the green and have a 'red edge' in the red, and should extrasolar photosynthesis be the same? We provide: 1) a brief review of how photosynthesis works; 2) an overview of the diversity of photosynthetic organisms, their light harvesting systems, and environmental ranges; 3) a synthesis of photosynthetic surface spectral signatures; 4) evolutionary rationales for photosynthetic surface reflectance spectra with regard to utilization of photon energy and the planetary light environment. Given the surface incident photon flux density spectrum and resonance transfer in light harvesting, we propose some rules with regard to where photosynthetic pigments will peak in absorbance: a) the wavelength of peak incident photon flux; b) the longest available wavelength for core antenna or reaction center pigments; and c) the shortest wavelengths within an atmospheric window for accessory pigments. That plants absorb less green light may not be an inefficient legacy of evolutionary history, but may actually satisfy the above criteria.

Spectral signatures of photosynthesis II: coevolution with other stars and the atmosphere on extrasolar worlds

Nancy Y. Kiang, Antigona Segura, Giovanna Tinetti, Govindjee, Robert E. Blankenship, Martin Cohen, Janet Siefert, David Crisp, Victoria S. Meadows

As photosynthesis on Earth produces the primary signatures of life that can be detected astronomically at the global scale, a strong focus of the search for extrasolar life will be photosynthesis, particularly photosynthesis that has evolved with a different parent star. We take planetary atmospheric compositions simulated by Segura, et al. (2003, 2005) for Earth-like planets around observed F2V and K2V stars, modeled M1V and M5V stars, and around the active M4.5V star AD Leo; our scenarios use Earth's atmospheric composition as well as very low O2 content in case anoxygenic photosynthesis dominates. We calculate the incident spectral photon flux densities at the surface of the planet and under water. We identify bands of available photosynthetically relevant radiation and find that photosynthetic pigments on planets around F2V stars may peak in absorbance in the blue, K2V in the red-orange, and M stars in the NIR, in bands at 0.93-1.1 microns, 1.1-1.4 microns, 1.5-1.8 microns, and 1.8-2.5 microns. In addition, we calculate wavelength restrictions for underwater organisms and depths of water at which they would be protected from UV flares in the early life of M stars. We estimate the potential productivity for both surface and underwater photosynthesis, for both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and for hypothetical photosynthesis in which longer wavelength, multi-photosystem series are used.

Biomarker Response to Galactic Cosmic Ray-Induced NOx and the Methane Greenhouse Effect in the Atmosphere of an Earthlike Planet Orbiting an M-Dwarf Star

John Lee Grenfell, Jean-Mathias Griessmeier, Beate Patzer, Heike Rauer, Antigona Segura, Anja Stadelmann, Barbara Stracke, Ruth Titz, Philip von Paris

Planets orbiting in the habitable zone (HZ) of M-Dwarf stars are subject to high levels of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) which produce nitrogen oxides in earthlike atmospheres. We investigate to what extent this NOx may modify biomarker compounds such as ozone (O3) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as related compounds such as water (H2O) (essential for life) and methane (CH4) (which has both abiotic and biotic sources) . Our model results suggest that such signals are robust, changing in the M-star world atmospheric column by up to 20% due to the GCR NOx effects compared to an M-star run without GCR effects and can therefore survive at least the effects of galactic cosmic rays. We have not however investigated stellar cosmic rays here. CH4 levels are about 10 times higher than on the Earth related to a lowering in hydroxyl (OH) in response to changes in UV. The increase is less than reported in previous studies. This difference arose partly because we used different biogenic input. For example, we employed 23% lower CH4 fluxes compared to those studies. Unlike on the Earth, relatively modest changes in these fluxes can lead to larger changes in the concentrations of biomarker and related species on the M-star world. We calculate a CH4 greenhouse heating effect of up to 4K. O3 photochemistry in terms of the smog mechanism and the catalytic loss cycles on the M-star world differs considerably compared with the Earth.

Habitable Planet Formation in Binary-Planetary Systems

Nader Haghighipour, Sean N. Raymond

Recent radial velocity observations have indicated that Jovian-type planets can exist in moderately close binary star systems. Numerical simulations of the dynamical stability of terrestrial-class planets in such environments have shown that, in addition to their giant planets, these systems can also harbor Earth-like objects. In this paper, we study the late stage of terrestrial planet formation in such binary-planetary systems, and present the results of the simulations of the formation of Earth-like bodies in their habitable zones. We consider a circumprimary disk of Moon- to Mars-sized objects and numerically integrate the orbits of these bodies at the presence of the Jovian-type planet of the system and for different values of the mass, semimajor axis, and orbital eccentricity of the secondary star. Results indicate that, Earth-like objects, with substantial amounts of water, can form in the habitable zone of the primary star. Simulations also indicate that, by transferring angular momentum from the secondary star to protoplanetary objects, the giant planet of the system plays a key role in the radial mixing of these bodies and the water contents of the final terrestrial planets. We will discuss the results of our simulation and show that the formation of habitable planets in binary-planetary systems is more probable in binaries with moderate to large perihelia.

Planets Formed in Habitable Zones of M Dwarf Stars Probably are Deficient in Volatiles

Jack J. Lissauer

Dynamical considerations, presented herein via analytic scalings and numerical experiments, imply that Earth-mass planets accreting in regions that become habitable zones of M dwarf stars form within several million years. Temperatures in these regions during planetary accretion are higher than those encountered by the material that formed the Earth. Collision velocities during and after the prime accretionary epoch are larger than for Earth. These factors suggest that planets orbiting low mass main sequence stars are likely to be either too distant (and thus too cold) for carbon/water based life on their surfaces or have abundances of the required volatiles that are substantially less than on Earth.

Are extrasolar oceans common throughout the Galaxy?

David Ehrenreich, Arnaud Cassan

Light and cold extrasolar planets such as OGLE 2005-BLG-390Lb, a 5.5 Earth-mass planet detected via microlensing, could be frequent in the Galaxy according to some preliminary results from microlensing experiments. These planets can be frozen rocky- or ocean-planets, situated beyond the snow line and, therefore, beyond the habitable zone of their system. They can nonetheless host a layer of liquid water, heated by radiogenic energy, underneath an ice shell surface for billions of years, before freezing completely. These results suggest that oceans under ice, like those suspected to be present on icy moons in the Solar system, could be a common feature of cold low-mass extrasolar planets.

Extreme Habitability: Formation of Habitable Planets in Systems with Close-in Giant Planets and/or Stellar Companions

Nader Haghighipour

With more than 260 extrasolar planetary systems discovered to-date, the search for habitable planets has found new grounds. Unlike our solar system, the stars of many of these planets are hosts to eccentric or close-in giant bodies. Several of these stars are also members of moderately close ($<$40 AU) binary or multi-star systems. The formation of terrestrial objects in these "extreme" environments is strongly affected by the dynamics of their giant planets and/or their stellar companions. These objects have profound effects on the chemical structure of the disk of planetesimals and the radial mixing of these bodies in the terrestrial regions of their host stars. For many years, it was believed that such effects would be so destructive that binary stars and also systems with close-in giant planets would not be able to form and harbor habitable bodies. Recent simulations have, however, proven otherwise. I will review the results of the simulations of the formation and long-term stability of Earth-like objects in the habitable zones of such "extreme" planetary systems, and discuss the possibility of the formation of terrestrial planets, with significant amounts of water, in systems with hot Jupiters, and also around the primaries of moderately eccentric close binary stars.

Five or six step scenario for evolution?

Brandon Carter

The prediction that (due to the limited amount of hydrogen available as fuel in the Sun) the future duration of our favourable terrestrial environment will be short (compared with the present age of the Earth) has been interpreted as evidence for a hard step scenario. This means that some of the essential steps (such as the development of eukaryotes) in the evolution process leading to the ultimate emergence of intelligent life would have been hard, in the sense of being against the odds in the available time, so that they are unlikely to have been achieved in most of the earth-like planets that may one day be discovered in nearby extra-solar systems. It was originally estimated that only one or two of the essential evolutionary steps had to have been hard in this sense, but it has become apparent that this figure may need upward revision, because recent studies of climatic instability suggest that the possible future duration of our biologically favourable environment may be shorter than had been supposed, only about one Giga year rather than five. On the basis of the statistical requirement of roughly equal spacing between hard steps, it is argued that the best fit with the fossil record is now obtainable by postulating the number of hard steps to be five, if our evolution was exclusively terrestrial, or six if, as now seems very plausible, the first step occurred on Mars.

Habitable Climates

David S. Spiegel, Kristen Menou, Caleb A. Scharf (Columbia University)

The Earth is only partially habitable according to the standard liquid-water definition. We reconsider planetary habitability in the framework of energy-balance models, the simplest seasonal models in physical climatology, to assess the spatial and temporal habitability of Earth-like planets. In order to quantify the degree of climatic habitability of our models, we define several metrics of fractional habitability. Previous evaluations of habitable zones may have omitted important climatic conditions by focusing on close Solar System analogies. For example, we find that model pseudo-Earths with different rotation rates or different land-ocean fractions generally have fractional habitabilities that differ significantly from that of the Earth itself. Furthermore, the stability of a planet's climate against albedo-feedback snowball events strongly impacts its habitability. Therefore, issues of climate dynamics may be central in assessing the habitability of discovered terrestrial exoplanets, especially if astronomical forcing conditions generally differ from the moderate Solar System cases.
avatar
Mongo
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 58
Age : 55
Location : Greater Toronto, Canada
Registration date : 2009-05-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 5:14 pm

part 6 of this list

2008

Discovery and Study of Nearby Habitable Planets with Mesolensing

Rosanne Di Stefano, Christopher Night

We demonstrate that gravitational lensing can be used to discover and study planets in the habitable zones of nearby dwarf stars. If appropriate software is developed, a new generation of monitoring programs will automatically conduct a census of nearby planets in the habitable zones of dwarf stars. In addition, individual nearby dwarf stars can produce lensing events at predictable times; careful monitoring of these events can discover any planets located in the zone of habitability. Because lensing can discover planets (1) in face-on orbits, and (2) in orbit around the dimmest stars, lensing techniques will provide complementary information to that gleaned through Doppler and/or transit investigations. The ultimate result will be a comprehensive understanding of the variety of systems with conditions similar to those that gave rise to life on Earth.

Detecting the Glint of Starlight on the Oceans of Distant Planets

D.M. Williams, E. Gaidos

We propose that astronomers will be eventually be able to discriminate between extrasolar Earth-like planets with surface oceans and those without using the shape of phase light curves in the visible and near-IR spectrum. We model the visible light curves of planets having Earth-like surfaces, seasons, and optically-thin atmospheres with idealized diffuse-scattering clouds. We show that planets partially covered by water will appear measurably brighter near crescent phase (relative to Lambertian planets) because of the efficient specular reflection (i.e., glint) of starlight incident on their surfaces at a highly oblique angle. Planets on orbits within 30 degrees of edge-on orientation (half of all planets) will show pronounced glint over a sizeable range of orbital longitudes, from quadrature to crescent, all outside the glare of their parent stars. Also, water-covered planets will appear darker than a Lambertian disk near full illumination. Finally, we show that planets with a mixed land/water surface will polarize the reflected signal by as much as 30-70 percent. These results suggest several new ways of directly identifying water on distant planets.

Formation and Detectability of Terrestrial Planets Around Alpha Centauri B

Javiera M. Guedes, Eugenio J. Rivera, Erica Davis, Gregory Laughlin, Elisa V. Quintana, Debra A. Fischer

We simulate the formation of planetary systems around Alpha Centauri B. The N-body accretionary evolution of a 1/r disk populated with 400-900 lunar-mass protoplanets is followed for 200 Myr. All simulations lead to the formation of multiple-planet systems with at least one planet in the 1-2 MEarth mass range at 0.5-1.5 AU. We examine the detectability of our simulated planetary systems by generating synthetic radial velocity observations including noise based on the radial velocity residuals to the recently published three planet fit to the nearby K0V star HD 69830. Using these synthetic observations, we find that we can reliably detect a 1.8 MEarth planet in the habitable zone of Alpha Centauri B after only three years of high cadence observations. We also find that the planet is detectable even if the radial velocity precision is 3 m/s, as long as the noise spectrum is white. Our results show that the greatest uncertainty in our ability to detect rocky planets in the Alpha Centauri system is the unknown magnitude of ultra-low frequency stellar noise.

DARWIN - A Mission to Detect, and Search for Life on, Extrasolar Planets

C. S. Cockell, A. Leger, M. Fridlund, T. Herbst, L. Kaltenegger, O. Absil, C. Beichman, W. Benz, M. Blanc, A. Brack, A. Chelli, L. Colangeli, H. Cottin, V. Coude du Foresto, W. Danchi, D. Defrere, J.-W. den Herder, C. Eiroa, J. Greaves, T. Henning, K. Johnston, H. Jones, L. Labadie, H. Lammer, R. Launhardt, P. Lawson, O. P. Lay, J.-M. LeDuigou, R. Liseau, F. Malbet, S. R. Martin, D. Mawet, D. Mourard, C. Moutou, L. Mugnier, F. Paresce, A. Quirrenbach, Y. Rabbia, J. A. Raven, H. J. A. Rottgering, D. Rouan, N. Santos, F. Selsis, E. Serabyn, H. Shibai, M. Tamura, E. Thiebaut, F. Westall, White, J. Glenn

The discovery of extra-solar planets is one of the greatest achievements of modern astronomy. The detection of planets with a wide range of masses demonstrates that extra-solar planets of low mass exist. In this paper we describe a mission, called Darwin, whose primary goal is the search for, and characterization of, terrestrial extrasolar planets and the search for life. Accomplishing the mission objectives will require collaborative science across disciplines including astrophysics, planetary sciences, chemistry and microbiology. Darwin is designed to detect and perform spectroscopic analysis of rocky planets similar to the Earth at mid-infrared wavelengths (6 - 20 micron), where an advantageous contrast ratio between star and planet occurs. The baseline mission lasts 5 years and consists of approximately 200 individual target stars. Among these, 25 to 50 planetary systems can be studied spectroscopically, searching for gases such as CO2, H2O, CH4 and O3. Many of the key technologies required for the construction of Darwin have already been demonstrated and the remainder are estimated to be mature in the near future. Darwin is a mission that will ignite intense interest in both the research community and the wider public.

The MEarth project: searching for transiting habitable super-Earths around nearby M-dwarfs

Jonathan Irwin, David Charbonneau, Philip Nutzman, Emilio Falco

Due to their small radii, M-dwarfs are very promising targets to search for transiting super-Earths, with a planet of 2 Earth radii orbiting an M5 dwarf in the habitable zone giving rise to a 0.5% photometric signal, with a period of two weeks. This can be detected from the ground using modest-aperture telescopes by targeting samples of nearby M-dwarfs. Such planets would be very amenable to follow-up studies due to the brightness of the parent stars, and the favourable planet-star flux ratio. MEarth is such a transit survey of ~2000 nearby M-dwarfs. Since the targets are distributed over the entire (Northern) sky, it is necessary to observe them individually, which will be done by using 8 independent 0.4m robotic telescopes, two of which have been in operation since December 2007 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) located on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. We discuss the survey design and hardware, and report on the current status of the survey, and preliminary results obtained from the commissioning data.

On the equilibrium rotation of Earth-like extra-solar planets

Alexandre C.M. Correia, Benjamin Levrard, Jacques Laskar

The equilibrium rotation of tidally evolved "Earth-like" extra-solar planets is often assumed to be synchronous with their orbital mean motion. The same assumption persisted for Mercury and Venus until radar observations revealed their true spin rates. As many of these planets follow eccentric orbits and are believed to host dense atmospheres, we expect the equilibrium rotation to differ from the synchronous motion. Here we provide a general description of the allowed final equilibrium rotation states of these planets, and apply this to already discovered cases in which the mass is lower than twelve Earth-masses. At low obliquity and moderate eccentricity, it is shown that there are at most four distinct equilibrium possibilities, one of which can be retrograde. Because most presently known "Earth-like" planets present eccentric orbits, their equilibrium rotation is unlikely to be synchronous.

Coreless Terrestrial Exoplanets

L. Elkins-Tanton, S. Seager

Differentiation in terrestrial planets is expected to include the formation of a metallic iron core. We predict the existence of terrestrial planets that have differentiated but have no metallic core--planets that are effectively a giant silicate mantle. We discuss two paths to forming a coreless terrestrial planet, whereby the oxidation state during planetary accretion and solidification will determine the size or existence of any metallic core. Under this hypothesis, any metallic iron in the bulk accreting material is oxidized by water, binding the iron in the form of iron oxide into the silicate minerals of the planetary mantle. The existence of such silicate planets has consequences for interpreting the compositions and interior density structures of exoplanets based on their mass and radius measurements.

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability

Brian Jackson, Rory Barnes, Richard Greenberg

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Geodynamics and Rate of Volcanism on Massive Earth-like Planets

Edwin S. Kite, Michael Manga, Eric Gaidos

We provide estimates of volcanism versus time for planets with Earth-like composition and masses from 0.25 to 25 times Earth, as a step toward predicting atmospheric mass on extrasolar rocky planets. Volcanism requires melting of the silicate mantle. We use a thermal evolution model, calibrated against Earth, in combination with standard melting models, to explore the dependence of convection-driven decompression mantle melting on planet mass. Here we show that (1) volcanism is likely to proceed on massive planets with plate tectonics over the main-sequence lifetime of the parent star; (2) crustal thickness (and melting rate normalized to planet mass) is weakly dependent on planet mass; (3) stagnant lid planets can have higher rates of melting than their plate tectonic counterparts early in their thermal evolution, but melting shuts down after a few Gyr; (4) plate tectonics may not operate on high mass planets because of the production of buoyant crust which is difficult to subduct; and (5) melting is necessary but insufficient for efficient volcanic degassing - volatiles partition into the earliest, deepest melts, which may be denser than the residue and sink to the base of the mantle on young, massive planets. Magma must also crystallize at or near the surface, and the pressure of overlying volatiles must be fairly low, if volatiles are to reach the surface.

Cryptic photosynthesis, Extrasolar planetary oxygen without a surface biological signature

C. S. Cockell, L. Kaltenegger, J. A. Raven

On the Earth, photosynthetic organisms are responsible for the production of nearly all of the oxygen in the atmosphere. On the land, vegetation reflects in the visible, leading to a red edge which has been proposed as a biosignature for life on extrasolar planets. However, in many regions of the Earth, and particularly where surface conditions are extreme, for example in hot and cold deserts, photosynthetic organisms can be driven into and under substrates where light is still sufficient for photosynthesis. These communities exhibit no detectable surface spectral signature. The same is true of the assemblages of photosynthetic organisms at more than a few meters depth in water bodies. These communities are widespread and dominate local photosynthetic productivity. We review known cryptic photosynthetic communities and their productivity. We use a radiative transfer model to link geomicrobiology with observational astronomy and calculate the disk-averaged spectra and identify detectable features that would result from a planet dominated by such a biota. The hypothetical cryptic photosynthesis worlds discussed here are Earth-analogs that would not exhibit a biological surface feature in the disc-averaged spectrum.
avatar
Mongo
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 58
Age : 55
Location : Greater Toronto, Canada
Registration date : 2009-05-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Mongo on 18th May 2009, 5:22 pm

part 7 of this list:

Habitability of Super-Earth Planets around Other Suns: Models including Red Giant Branch Evolution

W. von Bloh, M. Cuntz, K.-P. Schroeder, C. Bounama, S. Franck

The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super- Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production taking into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ) determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers the solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds". Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main-sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

2009

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and during the last Quaternary climatic extrema

Luc Arnold, François-Marie Bréon, Simon Brewer

The so-called Vegetation Red-Edge (VRE), a sharp increase in the reflectance around $700 nm$, is a characteristic of vegetation spectra, and can therefore be used as a biomarker if it can be detected in an unresolved extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here we investigate the potential for detection of vegetation spectra during the last Quaternary climatic extrema, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the Holocene optimum, for which past climatic simulations have been made. By testing the VRE detectability during these extrema when Earth's climate and biomes maps were different from today, we are able to test the vegetation detectability on a terrestrial planet different from our modern Earth. Data from the Biome3.5 model have been associated to visible GOME spectra for each biome and cloud cover to derive Earth's integrated spectra for given Earth phases and observer positions. The VRE is then measured. Results show that the vegetation remains detectable during the last climatic extrema. Compared to current Earth, the Holocene optimum with a greener Sahara slightly increases the mean VRE on one hand, while on the other hand, the large ice cap over the northern Hemisphere during the LGM decreases vegetation detectability. We finally discuss the detectability of the VRE in the context of recently proposed space missions.

Formation and Detection of Earth Mass Planets around Low Mass Stars

Ryan Montgomery, Greg Laughlin

We investigate an in-situ formation scenario for Earth-mass terrestrial planets in short-period, potentially habitable orbits around low-mass stars (M_star < 0.3 M_sun). We then investigate the feasibility of detecting these Earth-sized planets. Our simulations of terrestrial planet formation follow the growth of planetary embryos in an annular region around a fiducial M7 primary. Our simulations couple a semi-analytic model to a full N-body integration to follow the growth from ~3x10^21 g to the final planetary system configurations that generally consist of 3-5 planets with masses of order 0.1 - 1.0 M_earth in or near the habitable zone of the star. To obtain a concrete estimate of the detectability of the planets arising in our simulations, we present a detailed Monte-Carlo transit detection simulation. We find that detection of 1 R_earth planets around the local M-dwarfs is challenging for a 1m class ground-based photometric search, but that detection of planets of larger radius is a distinct possibility. The detection of Earth-sized planets is straightforward, however, with an all-sky survey by a low-cost satellite mission. Given a reduced correlated noise level of 0.45 mmag and an intermediate planetary ice-mass fraction of planets orbiting a target list drawn from the nearest late-type M dwarfs, a ground-based photometric search could detect, on average, 0.8 of these planets with an extended search. A space-based photometric search (similar to the TESS mission) should discover ~17 of these Earth-sized planets during it's two year survey, with an assumed occurrence fraction of 28%.

Transits of Earth-Like Planets

L. Kaltenegger, W.A. Traub

Transmission spectroscopy of Earth-like exoplanets is a potential tool for habitability screening. Transiting planets are present-day "Rosetta Stones" for understanding extrasolar planets because they offer the possibility to characterize giant planet atmospheres and should provide an access to biomarkers in the atmospheres of Earth-like exoplanets, once they are detected. Using the Earth itself as a proxy we show the potential and limits of the transiting technique to detect biomarkers on an Earth-analog exoplanet in transit. We quantify the Earths cross section as a function of wavelength, and show the effect of each atmospheric species, aerosol, and Rayleigh scattering. Clouds do not significantly affect this picture because the opacity of the lower atmosphere from aerosol and Rayleigh losses dominates over cloud losses. We calculate the optimum signal-to-noise ratio for spectral features in the primary eclipse spectrum of an Earth-like exoplanet around a Sun-like star and also M stars, for a 6.5-m telescope in space. We find that the signal to noise values for all important spectral features are on the order of unity or less per transit - except for the closest stars - making it difficult to detect such features in one single transit, and implying that co-adding of many transits will be essential.
avatar
Mongo
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 58
Age : 55
Location : Greater Toronto, Canada
Registration date : 2009-05-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 18th May 2009, 5:31 pm

Your effort is appreciated. This will make it fairly easy to reference such related material without having to search extensively for it.

Thanks. Smile
Welcome to the forum.

_________________
Caps Lock: Cruise control for 'Cool'!
avatar
Sirius_Alpha
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 3494
Location : Earth
Registration date : 2008-04-06

View user profile http://solar-flux.forumandco.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: ARXIV papers on Earthlike exoplanets

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum