TESS

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TESS

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 8th December 2008, 9:09 pm

Expected Planet and False Positive Detection Rates for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
http://arxiv.org/abs/0812.1305

Abstract wrote:The proposed Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will survey the entire sky to locate the nearest and brightest transiting extrasolar planets with orbital periods up to about 36 days. Here we estimate the number and kind of astrophysical false positives that TESS will report, along with the number of extrasolar planets. These estimates are then used to size the ground-based follow-up observing efforts needed to confirm and characterize the planets. We estimate that the needed observing resources will be about 1400 telescope-nights of imaging with 0.5m to 1m-class telescopes, 300 telescope-nights with 1m to 2m-class telescopes for the classification of the host stars and for radial velocity measurements with roughly 1 km/s precision, and 380 telescope-nights with 2m to 4m-class telescopes for radial velocity studies with precision of a few m/s. Follow-up spectroscopy of the smallest planets discovered by TESS at the best possible velocity precision will be limited by the number of telescope nights available on 4m to 10m class telescopes with instruments such as HARPS and HIRES, but the pay-off of such efforts will be the determination of masses for Super Earths with sufficient accuracy to distinguish rocky desert planets from water worlds.


Last edited by Sirius_Alpha on 5th April 2013, 4:58 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: TESS

Post by Edasich on 9th December 2008, 8:57 am

Well, I would like to see some results too.
Such surveys usually turns out not conclusive.
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Re: TESS

Post by Borislav on 20th June 2009, 8:45 am

TESS has failled pale Sad
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/jun/HQ_09-141_SMEX_Selections.html
http://twitter.com/TESS_NASA

What impact on exoplanets plans! Solar and X-rays astronomy important exoplanets? Crying or Very sad

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Re: TESS

Post by Lazarus on 20th June 2009, 9:46 am

Oh well. At least Kepler's up there.
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Re: TESS

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 20th June 2009, 10:25 am

This sucks, but I'm not convinced that all is lost. TESS's target stars are supposed to be bright ones, right? So if any superEarths and/or Neptunes transit them, shouldn't that be detectable from the ground anyway? (albeit at less precision).

Borislav wrote:Solar and X-rays astronomy important exoplanets?
It could be said that exoplanets don't have an effect on the health and well-being of Earth and it's population. Still, I wanted TESS Sad

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Re: TESS

Post by TheoA on 20th January 2010, 4:57 pm

http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2010-01/mit-space-telescope-could-find-thousands-exoplanets-just-two-years

But with Kepler already hunting exoplanets, it may be tough for MIT's
proposal to pass muster with NASA. The space agency already rejected an
earlier incarnation of TESS but left the door open for the MIT team to
submit an improved pitch later this year. A modified TESS proposal is
in the works.

Hold on.

All may not be lost yet.

From what I read NASA is looking for a simplified mission.

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Re: TESS

Post by Daniel on 20th January 2010, 5:02 pm

this is the article on centauri dreams: http://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=11098#comments
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Re: TESS

Post by Daniel on 18th December 2010, 6:36 pm

News About TESS on nextbigfuture:

Earthlike planet detection with combination of satellite missions from MIT

http://nextbigfuture.com/2010/12/earthlike-planet-detection-with.html

MIT news:

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/exoplanet-series-1-1214.html

Another satellite effort currently underway at MIT is ExoplanetSat:

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7731E..66S and

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7731E..54P
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Re: TESS

Post by Borislav on 19th December 2010, 8:30 am

Wow - project even improved!

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/exoplanet-series-1-1214.html
Although NASA elected not to proceed with TESS in 2009, the agency is accepting new proposals later this year and has increased the budget from $105 million to $200 million.

This fall, the TESS team has been finalizing a new proposal that reflects the budget increase. “The higher cost cap means we can use bigger cameras and bigger lenses to get more data,” says Seager, who is the deputy mission scientist for TESS. The group is also refining its estimates of the number and type of exoplanets that TESS could find.

Probably, this means improving the accuracy of photometry.

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Re: TESS

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 5th April 2013, 4:58 pm

Very Happy TESS is selected for launch in 2017.

http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2013/apr/HQ_13-088_Astro_Explorer_Mission_.html

Party time!

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Re: TESS

Post by Led_Zep on 7th April 2013, 3:27 pm

Two new satellites in 2017 : TESS and CHEOPS !!

Very good news !!! Very Happy
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Re: TESS

Post by Lazarus on 8th April 2013, 2:11 pm

Greg Laughlin's take on it at Systemic

My favourite bit:
I think we currently have substantially less understanding of the extrasolar planets than is generally assumed. Thousands of planets are known, but there is no strong evidence that any of them bear a particular resemblance to the planets within our own solar system. There’s always a tendency, perfectly encapsulated by the discipline of astrobiology, with its habitable zones and its preoccupation with water — to make wild extrapolations into the complete unknown.
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Re: TESS

Post by ThinkerX on 9th April 2013, 12:31 am

I like that 'Systemic' Blog.

I especially like the way he quoted Lovecraft at the start of the last post. I've thought for a long while now (several decades) that Lovecraft was on to something in some of his stories.

I remember watching the interviews with the names of the day and reading some of the first articles to make print after the old space probes made the first flyby's of Jupiter and Saturn. One and all, those folks, very smart, very well educated, were completely flabbergasted. None of them expected anything remotely similiar to Io, for example.

A couple decades later (or was it a decade and a half?) I remember reading about similiar reactions to the discovery of the first 'hot jupiters' and 'pulsar planets'.

All of which makes me strongly suspect that the current models for many of these exoplanets are really seriously lacking, that the models are way off in some manner.

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Re: TESS

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 9th April 2013, 7:52 am

Well the models at that time were definitely lacking (migration certainly hadn't been considered to be so influential). Though even now it's not clear how exactly hot Jupiter systems form.

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Re: TESS

Post by Lazarus on 9th April 2013, 1:12 pm

IIRC volcanism on Io was predicted theoretically a few days before the discovery.

As regards hot Jupiters, the first mention of the concept was apparently from 1952 by Otto Struve... didn't attract much attention at the time though.
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Re: TESS

Post by Galzi on 15th April 2013, 6:25 am

Video about TESS mission orbital and observation strategy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=mpViVEO-ymc


While Kepler was intended to gather statistics on exoplanets population, including habitable Earth-like planets, TESS main objective appears to be the detection of a sample of nearby small exoplanets easy to study by JWST and RV follow-up for detailed characterization

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=tess-exoplanets

The spacecraft will examine a patch of sky some 400 times larger than the field of stars Kepler scans, explains TESS principal investigator George Ricker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology astrophysicist [...] “Altogether we’ll examine about half a million stars.” Thousands of those stars are within 100 light-years of the solar system. [...] The trade-off in surveying such a large area of sky is that TESS may miss some potentially habitable planets. Planets that follow Earth-like orbits around sunlike stars complete an orbit roughly once a year, revealing themselves to Kepler for a brief window each time. With its wandering eye, TESS will miss out on many of those planets with longer-duration orbits. “The goal of Kepler is to answer the very basic question of how many sunlike stars have Earth-like planets orbiting about them in the habitable zone,” Ricker says. “In the case of TESS we’re answering a different question. We’re actually trying to identify the planetary systems that are in the solar neighborhood.”

Regardless, if TESS can indeed locate hundreds of nearby planets, astronomers will have their hands full for the foreseeable future—finding out what those planets are like, what kinds of habitats they might support and, just maybe, flinging some future probe toward one enticing-looking world. “For decades, centuries to come, these are going to be the ones that are the real targets,” Ricker says.

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Re: TESS

Post by ThinkerX on 15th April 2013, 8:53 pm

Maybe this should be a separate thread, but as the topic veering towards my long term pet project...

RECONS claims 51 (now 52) star systems within 5 parsecs of the sun.

The RECONS '100 nearest star list' runs out to about 6.55 parsecs; adding the new system, that should be 101 star systems within 6.55 parsecs. Of these systems, 23 include stars with absolute magnitudes of 3.5 to 10, making them roughly 'sunlike'. (F5V down to about M2V). Some multiple systems contain more than one sunlike star, but this is systems we are dealing with here, NOT individual stars.

Extrapolate from the 5 parsec sample, and there should be 6375 star systems within 25 parsecs (81.5 light years), give or take.

Extrapolate from the '100 Nearest Star Systems' list (6.55 parsecs) and the total should be 5563 star systems within 25 parsecs.

The RECONS 25 parsec 'movie has 2090 systems with good distances. Which means by either extrapolation, there are a lot of missing stars - something on the order of 3000 - 4000 for the 25 parsec set.

http://www.chara.gsu.edu/~riedel/25pc2011.html

When I consult the 'Extended Hiparcos' (sp?) catalog (best combination of Hip data I know of), I get 941 roughly sunlike stars. Probably there are another couple dozen sunlike stars in the Gliese or Yale catalogs which Hip didn't measure. (I know there are at least half a dozen, an exact count is on my eventual to do list).

This gives us two volume measures for sunlike stars in the local area:

the 6.55 parsec sample, which is probably complete, but also a bit overly small, volume wise, for a percentage of 23% roughly sunlike stars;

and the 25 parsec sample which is definitely incomplete, but probably contains 95% (?) of the sunlike stars in that area. The percentage here is about 17%, give or take a bit - remember, this data is incomplete, and the error bars on some of these distances are substantial.

Now...lets extrapolate this a bit further, out to 50 parsecs. The Gliese and Yale distances mostly stop at 25 parsecs, limitations of ground based parallaxes and all. That leaves the Hip (XHip).

Stepping up from the 6.55 parsec sample, there should be 38,941 systems in the 25 to 50 parsec range 81.5 - 163 lightyears), and of these, using the 25 parsec sample as a base (more volume, and hopefully more accurate) about 6650 roughly sunlike stars. Xhip lists 4496 systems with stars of absolute magnitude 3.5 to 10 in the 25 to 50 parsec range. 6650 expected - 4496 means about 2000 roughly sunlike stars look to be 'missing' from this sample, along with....call it about 28,000 other stars.

I stepped this up to 50-100 parsecs (approx 311,000 total stars, 53,200 roughly sunlike, 9363 roughly sunlike stars listed in XHip, or about 43,800 'missing' sunlike stars) and

100 - 200 parsecs (2,492,000 total stars, expected 425,600 roughly sunlike, 3665 listed in XHip, meaning about 422,000 'unknown' sunlike stars in that range).

A couple years ago, I used a ... unique ... specroscopic-photometric distance system (distances good to within 20% about 75% of the time, or according to a RECONS pro, a error bar of just under 20%) to determine distances to about 36,000 stars in the ASCC of spectral types F5 to K7.

Over the past couple of months, I have been painfully converting this to a pure photometric system with about the same range of accuracy. In case you have not figured it out yet, it is geared towards finding stars with absolute magnitudes of 3.5 to10. (Yes, I might have taken it down to absolute magnitude 10.5 or 11, but the system runs into problems).

Next winter, I intend to go back through the ASCC and hopefully reconstruct most of Tarter and Turnbull's 'Habcat II', followed by a jaunt into NOMAD. I figure this system will not find all of the stars within that range, but it should find and give distances to most of them.

In conjunction with this is to try to weed out the 'best sunlike stars' from the ones that only seem to be sunlike.

Questions?

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Re: TESS

Post by Led_Zep on 3rd June 2014, 11:10 am


http://arxiv.org/abs/1406.0151

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
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Re: TESS

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 8th November 2014, 4:16 am

NASA’s TESS Mission Cleared for Next Development Phase
http://spacefellowship.com/news/art41935/nasa-s-tess-mission-cleared-for-next-development-phase.html

NASA has officially confirmed the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission, clearing it to move forward into the development phase. This marks a significant step for the TESS mission, which would search the entire sky for planets outside our solar system, known as exoplanets.

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Re: TESS

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 16th December 2014, 8:04 pm

TESS is going to launch on a Falcon 9v1.1 rocket.
http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=44690

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Re: TESS

Post by Led_Zep on 6th January 2017, 9:02 pm

Twitter :

After review of the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle certification schedule & anomaly recovery @NASA_TESS launch date has moved to NET 3/20/18
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Re: TESS

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 27th July 2017, 4:51 pm

Apparently TESS's cameras are slightly out of focus.
http://spacenews.com/cameras-on-nasa-exoplanet-spacecraft-slightly-out-of-focus/

"NASA confirmed July 26 that the focus of the four cameras on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) spacecraft will drift when the spacecraft cools to operating temperatures after launch next March. The problem was noticed in recent tests when the cameras were chilled to approximately -75 degrees Celsius. "Recent tests show the cameras on TESS are slightly out of focus when placed in the cold temperatures of space where it will be operating," NASA spokesperson Felicia Chou said in response to a SpaceNews inquiry. "After a thorough engineering evaluation, NASA has concluded TESS can fully accomplish its science mission with the cameras as they are, and will proceed with current integration activities." ... "The question is how much science degradation will there be in the results," Boss said. "The TESS team thinks there will be a 10 percent cut in terms of the number of planets that they expect to be able to detect."

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Re: TESS

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