Distances, Luminosities, and Temperatures of the Coldest Known Substellar Objects

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Distances, Luminosities, and Temperatures of the Coldest Known Substellar Objects

Post by Stalker on 8th September 2013, 3:01 am

Distances, Luminosities, and Temperatures of the Coldest Known Substellar Objects
The coolest known brown dwarfs are our best analogs to extrasolar gas-giant planets. The prolific detections of such cold substellar objects in the past two years has spurred intensive followup, but the lack of accurate distances is a key gap in our understanding. We present a large sample of precise distances based on homogeneous mid-infrared astrometry that robustly establish absolute fluxes, luminosities, and temperatures. The coolest brown dwarfs have temperatures of 400-450 K and masses ~5-20 times that of Jupiter, showing they bridge the gap between hotter brown dwarfs and gas-giant planets. At these extremes, spectral energy distributions no longer follow a simple correspondence with temperature, suggesting an increasing role of other physical parameters such as surface gravity, vertical mixing, clouds, and metallicity.
http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/news/1554-feature13-05-Coldest-Brown-Dwarfs-Blur-Star-Planet-Lines

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