Exoplanet temperatures

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Exoplanet temperatures

Post by planetaryscience on 9th May 2013, 6:07 pm

There is a website i went on a while ago (http://www.openexoplanetcatalogue.com/systems.html) which shows the temperatures of planets in kelvin. i comprised a list of the ones in which hare habitable and have them right here in the following: Smile
(I'm not complete yet, i got up to HD 102329 b)

Gliese 581 d: -92.15 degrees Celsius. 181 kelvin. -133.87 degrees Fahrenheit.
Semi major axis: 0.22
System: Gliese 581.
System components: 1 star, 6 planets
Mass (Earth): 6.03991
Composition: probably holds water or ice, most likely a Super-Earth.
Distance (parsecs): 6.21
Time to travel to (0.1% speed of light): approximately 20,300 years



16 Cygni B b: -85.55 degrees Celsius. 187.6 kelvin. -121.99 degrees Fahrenheit.
Semi major axis: 1.68
System: 16 Cygni
System components: 3 stars, 1 planet
Mass: 534.0552
Composition: Jupiter-like, but hotter.
Distance: 21.41
Time to travel to: 69,800 years



Gliese 876 b: -78.95 C. 194.2 K. -110.11 F.
Semi major axis: 0.208317
System: Gliese 876
System components: 1 star, 4 planets
Mass: 723.390484
Composition: Super-Jupiter, moons maybe Earth-like.
Distance: 4.7
Time to travel to: 15,300 years


(first 3 planets, will post more tomorrow)
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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by planetaryscience on 10th May 2013, 10:41 am

Update: looked into some more exoplanets and got the temperatures for 14 more.

as promised: 3 more!

HD 106270 b: -85.55 c. 187.6 K. -121.99 F.
Semi major axis: 4.3
System: HD 106270
System components: 1 star, 1 planet
Mass: 3496.79
Composition: most likely a brown dwarf, but very cold.
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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by planetaryscience on 10th May 2013, 10:43 am

oops, forgot to include more information:
Distance: 84.9
Time to travel to: 276,900 years
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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by planetaryscience on 10th May 2013, 10:47 am

HD 10647 b: -77.25 C. 195.9 K. -107.05 F.
Semi major axis: 2.015
System: HD 10647
System components: 1 star, 1 planet
Mass: 298.8166
Composition: Very Jupiter-like, slightly less massive.
Distance: 17.3
Time to travel to: 56,400 years
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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by planetaryscience on 10th May 2013, 10:50 am

47 Uma b: -73.55 C. 199.6 K. -100.39 F.
Semi major axis: 2.1
System: 47 Uma
System components: 1 star, 3 planets
Mass: 804.2617
Composition: super-Jupiter. Moon(s) earth like
Distance: 13.97
Time to travel to: 45,600 years
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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 10th May 2013, 11:39 am

What exactly are you aiming to achieve with this? Are you just trying to duplicate the EPE with additional unknown information?
For all of these RV planets you mention, all we know of is their orbital period, eccentricity, longitude of periapsis, minimum mass and minimum semi-major axis. That's literally all we know. We know nothing about their composition or moons. It's entirely possible that HD 10647 b is a star for example, since it's mass is only given as a lower limit. The true mass is given by mp = mRV / sin i, where i is the (unknown) inclination angle between the plane of the orbit and the plane of the sky. Furthermore, these temperatures you cite are also completely unknown and for the present time, unknowable. I'm sure you're aware of the fact that atmospheric properties have a profound effect on surface temperature. Furthermore, a extrasolar planet's albedo, which has a strong influence on its temperature, is generally unknown.

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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by planetaryscience on 10th May 2013, 11:46 am

New exoplanet added just now to temperatures:

HD 113538 b: -80.55 C. 192.6 K. -112.99 F.
Semi major axis: 0.71
System: HD 113538
System components: 1 star, 2 planets
Mass: 85.8303
Composition: warm Neptune. Icy moons.
Distance: 15.8
Time to travel to: 51,500 years

Well, i'm putting information about the planets that we know. The temperatures included are scientists BEST ESTIMATE for the surface (or top of clouds) for the planet. the information i am using is located at: http://www.openexoplanetcatalogue.com/system.html?id=HD%20113538%20b
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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by Lazarus on 10th May 2013, 12:26 pm

So why do you feel the need to copy the information from there to here?

What are you hoping to achieve by this?

(And your description of what you think these temperature values represent is somewhat off too...)
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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by Shellface on 10th May 2013, 9:08 pm



Christ, you're a gung-ho thing.

So, you've made a dozen-odd posts in like a day? Okay, let's analyse those.

  • Five posts in this thread, copying information from an esteemed website and then making it less useful? Solid start there.
  • A reasonable question. Okay, that's better.
  • A seven-month bump. Mmm…
  • Some… fan… "fic"… thing. Ah yes, now let me tell you about the time that this sub-snake explnsmoded out of nowhere…
  • A naming contest. Okay, why?! naming conventions for exoplanets is literally one of the most widely-discussed topics at current times, right after "Is there life out there?", to the point where the big scientist name-types are discussing it. So you saunter up to a relevant forum, and half-demand people give you names with some allusion to this being of influence?…
  • Confused scrawning over Fomalhaut concerning a sample not including Fomalhaut. Yep.

…Can you, like… calm down? Maybe take a few hours to read through some a lot of posts? That would be great.

On an unrelated note,
Sirius wrote:It's entirely possible that HD 10647 b is a star for example, since it's mass is only given as a lower limit.
Don't you say that about my favourite planet for some reason! Ol' '647's maximum mass is constrained from the Hipparcos astrometry as <13 MJ. But yes, there are cases like Rho Coronae Borealis b/B and possibly HD 195019 b/B where the minimum mass is over a hundred times less than the true one, making the companion stellar.

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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 10th May 2013, 9:54 pm

Shellface wrote:…Ol' '647's maximum mass is constrained from the Hipparcos astrometry as <13 MJ.
Good point. I should check my notes before making a generalised statement about a system.

To expand on what shellface wrote:

We welcome participation, but like with any science-related forum, keeping the signal-to-noise ratio high is very important. Discussion of the actual science is of foremost importance. I'd take shellface's advice and read around for a few hours to see what kind of interaction goes on here.

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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by planetaryscience on 15th May 2013, 2:35 pm

k sorry im new to the forum, I didnt know much about what everyone did here. Ill cool down, meanwhile, could you tell me the kind of stuff you DO do on the forum?
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Re: Exoplanet temperatures

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 15th May 2013, 3:16 pm

planetaryscience wrote:could you tell me the kind of stuff you DO do on the forum?
The science relating to extrasolar planets, in the context of what is actually known and relevant to the planets and how to study them.

Sure knowing the "travel time" to an extrasolar planet is within the context of what's known, but it really isn't particularly useful information.

I definitely encourage you to browse around the forum and read a few of the threads.

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