SuperWASP Results

Page 4 of 12 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 10, 11, 12  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 9th February 2010, 9:25 pm

H-band thermal emission from the 0.79-day period planet WASP-19b
http://arxiv.org/abs/1002.1947

Abstract wrote:We present the first ground-based detection of thermal emission from an exoplanet in the H-band. Using HAWK-I on the VLT, we observed an occultation of WASP-19b by its G8V-type host star. WASP-19b is a Jupiter-mass planet with an orbital period of only 0.79 d, and thus, being highly irradiated, is expected to be hot. We measure an H-band occultation depth of (0.259 +0.046 -0.044) %. A cloud-free model of the planet's atmosphere, with no redistribution of energy from day-side to night-side, under-predicts the planet/star flux density ratio by a factor of two. As the stellar parameters, and thus the level of planetary irradiation, are well-constrained by measurement, it is likely that our model of the planet's atmosphere is too simple.

_________________
Caps Lock: Cruise control for 'Cool'!
avatar
Sirius_Alpha
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 3403
Location : Earth
Registration date : 2008-04-06

View user profile http://solar-flux.forumandco.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 10th February 2010, 9:20 pm

Ground-based detection of thermal emission from the exoplanet WASP-19b
http://arxiv.org/abs/1002.1996

Abstract wrote:We present an occultation of the newly discovered hot Jupiter system WASP-19, observed with the HAWK-I instrument on the VLT, in order to measure thermal emission from the planet's dayside at ~2 um. The light curve was analysed using a Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method to find the eclipse depth and the central transit time. The transit depth was found to be 0.366+-0.072 %, corresponding to a brightness temperature of 2540+-180 K. This is significantly higher than the calculated (zero-albedo) equilibrium temperature, and indicates that the planet shows poor redistribution of heat to the night side, consistent with models of highly irradiated planets. Further observations are needed to confirm the existence of a temperature inversion. The central eclipse time was found to be consistent with a circular orbit.

_________________
Caps Lock: Cruise control for 'Cool'!
avatar
Sirius_Alpha
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 3403
Location : Earth
Registration date : 2008-04-06

View user profile http://solar-flux.forumandco.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Lazarus on 10th March 2010, 6:57 pm

Two recent ones about the radius of WASP-10b. There had been some disagreement about this previously, however both of these come to similar conclusions.

Photometric observation of transiting extrasolar planet WASP - 10b
Transit Observations of the WASP-10 System
avatar
Lazarus
dG star
dG star

Number of posts : 2772
Registration date : 2008-06-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 4th April 2010, 2:39 pm

http://www.astro.gla.ac.uk/nam2010/images/nam-abstracts-final_web.pdf
The SuperWASP Project
Andrew Cameron (University of St Andrews) with D. Pollacco, C. Hellier, R. West, and WASP
Consortium
The WASP consortium is currently the world's leading producer of extra-solar planets transiting bright stars. Its two automated wide-field camera arrays, SuperWASP on La Palma and WASP-South at Sutherland, each image some 15 percent of the sky with a cadence of 7 to 8 minutes for between 4 and 8 hours each night. Automated software identifies stars exhibiting the one-percent dips in light, recurring every few days, that betray the presence of a compact sub- stellar companion. Efficient winnowing of likely candidates for radialvelocity followup, in collaboration with the Geneva and IAP/Haute-Provence planet search teams, has led to the discovery of some 30 transiting planets to date. In this presentation I will announce a number of newly confirmed WASP planets. WASP's published planet discoveries are enriching our understanding of the closest-orbiting gas giant planets around other stars. They include the hottest, most inflated and shortest period planets yet identified. Many have relatively mundane circular orbits in the stellar equatorial plane. Others have highly disturbed eccentric, inclined and even retrograde orbits. They reveal a rich set of planetary formation and migration histories. Some are grossly inflated by a combination of extreme irradiation and tidal energy dissipation. A small number orbit so close to their stars that tidal orbit decay will lead to their destruction within the main-sequence lifetimes of their host stars. Above all, the WASP systems are bright. Their dayside thermal radiation is accessible to SPITZER and has even been detected from the ground, revealing a wealth of information about their atmospheric thermal structure and chemistry. I will preview the first public release of processed light curve data from the initial year of the WASP project, which will take place this year.



The SuperWASP public archive
Oliver Butters (University of Leicester) with R.G. West, D. Pollacco, C. Hellier, A.C. Cameron,
and WASP Consortium
The SuperWASP (Wide Angle Search for Planets) project is the world's leading transiting xoplanet survey. It consists of two robotic observatories (one in the Northern hemisphere and the other in the Southern hemisphere) that constantly monitor the night sky. Images are taken simultaneously from eight wide-angle cameras in each case. Data first started to be taken in 2004, since then the dataset has been extensively searched for transiting exoplanets. Other (non exoplanet) cience has come from the data also, such as the correlation of ROSAT sources with variable stars and asteroid studies, but there is still a wealth of other science that can be done with the data. With this in mind we announce the first public data release of the SuperWASP archive. This first data release (DR1) starts in 2004 in the North and 2006 in the South and stretches to 2008 in both cases. This corresponds to just under five million images, each 7.8x7.8 degrees. From these images over 100 billion data points have been extracted for over 20 million unique objects. The SuperWASP public archive makes all this data searchable and downloadable via a web interface hosted at the University of Leicester.


Last edited by Sirius_Alpha on 4th April 2010, 6:03 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Un-bolding)

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 4th April 2010, 2:51 pm

Borislav wrote:This first data release (DR1) starts in 2004 in the North and 2006 in the South and stretches to 2008 in both cases. This corresponds to just under five million images, each 7.8x7.8 degrees. From these images over 100 billion data points have been extracted for over 20 million unique objects.
This is an average of about 5000 measurements for each star.

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 4th April 2010, 6:30 pm

For comparison

http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.2924
The ongoing HATNet project is a wide-field search for transiting extrasolar planets (TEPs) orbiting relatively bright stars. The project employs a network of 7 robotic telescopes (4 in Arizona at Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, 2 in Hawaii on the roof of the Sub-Millimeter Array at Mauna Kea Observatory, and 1 in Israel at Wise Observatory; the latter is referred to as WHAT, see Shporer et al. 2009) which have been used to obtain some 700, 000 images covering approximately 10% of the sky. The survey has generated light curves for approximately 2.5 million stars, from which  900 candidate TEPs have been identified.


Ie SuperWASP received 7 times more data than HATnet (number of images), and plated in 10-fold larger area of the sky.

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

WASP results

Post by lodp on 11th April 2010, 8:26 pm

Wasp 22b & 26b now up at arXiV

lodp
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 57
Location : Leeds, UK
Registration date : 2009-08-11

View user profile http://www.lodp2.plus.com

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 11th April 2010, 9:19 pm

WASP-22b, in a triple system.
WASP-26b

_________________
Caps Lock: Cruise control for 'Cool'!
avatar
Sirius_Alpha
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 3403
Location : Earth
Registration date : 2008-04-06

View user profile http://solar-flux.forumandco.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Edasich on 12th April 2010, 5:32 am

Awesome. Waiting for previous ones (20-25) as well as WASP-8 b yet unpublished and orbital solution too for WASP-9. Very Happy
avatar
Edasich
dM star
dM star

Number of posts : 1500
Location : Tau Ceti g - Mid Latitudes
Registration date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 12th April 2010, 6:35 am

WASP-9 was retracted.

_________________
Caps Lock: Cruise control for 'Cool'!
avatar
Sirius_Alpha
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 3403
Location : Earth
Registration date : 2008-04-06

View user profile http://solar-flux.forumandco.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Edasich on 12th April 2010, 10:51 am

Sirius_Alpha wrote:WASP-9 was retracted.

I'm talking about orbital solution. I'd like to know how the system is actually configured (eclipsing binary with late M dwarf or multiple system)... Rolling Eyes
avatar
Edasich
dM star
dM star

Number of posts : 1500
Location : Tau Ceti g - Mid Latitudes
Registration date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by lodp on 12th April 2010, 1:27 pm

What about WASP 27b through 34b?

http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/~ch/wasps.html

lodp
Asteroid
Asteroid

Number of posts : 57
Location : Leeds, UK
Registration date : 2009-08-11

View user profile http://www.lodp2.plus.com

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Lazarus on 12th April 2010, 2:24 pm

Regarding WASP-22b, the hierarchical triple system is (star + planet) + distant companion, this is not a triple star system. Oh well.
avatar
Lazarus
dG star
dG star

Number of posts : 2772
Registration date : 2008-06-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 12th April 2010, 3:03 pm

Lazarus wrote:Regarding WASP-22b, the hierarchical triple system is (star + planet) + distant companion, this is not a triple star system. Oh well.
Yeah, figured that out after reading the paper

lodp wrote:What about WASP 27b through 34b?
Oh wow! That's pretty impressive. WASP seems to be for transit photometry what HARPS is doing for low mass exoplanet doppler spectroscopy.

_________________
Caps Lock: Cruise control for 'Cool'!
avatar
Sirius_Alpha
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 3403
Location : Earth
Registration date : 2008-04-06

View user profile http://solar-flux.forumandco.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 13th April 2010, 3:34 am

http://www.superwasp.org/wasp_planets.htm
Update?

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Edasich on 13th April 2010, 6:36 am

Shall we dance!!!

And there are host stars too!

OMG! WASP-8 is 1SWASPJ235936.07-350152.9.
I'm proud to announce it is located in ...Sculptor. Oh so?

Am I becoming prophet? Laughing
avatar
Edasich
dM star
dM star

Number of posts : 1500
Location : Tau Ceti g - Mid Latitudes
Registration date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 13th April 2010, 6:52 am

Surprised, but now there has information on almost all the planets, except for WASP-20, 27, 30, 31, 32, 34.

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 13th April 2010, 6:55 am

The SuperWASP project is pleased to announce the discovery of 9 new planets. WASP-8b, WASP-21b, WASP-22b, WASP-24b, WASP-25b, WASP-26b, WASP-28b, WASP-29b and WASP-33b were announced on 13th April 2010, and take our planet haul up to Twenty-Six. This page contains information on where you can find our planets, what they're like, and a bit about their parent star. If you'd like to find out more about exoplanets in general, then click here.

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Edasich on 13th April 2010, 7:03 am

Discovery papers available

http://www.superwasp.org/publications.htm

WASP-33 b looks the first planet transiting an A-type star. Wow!!
avatar
Edasich
dM star
dM star

Number of posts : 1500
Location : Tau Ceti g - Mid Latitudes
Registration date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 13th April 2010, 7:54 am

Edasich wrote:WASP-33 b looks the first planet transiting an A-type star. Wow!!

Star bright enough. It turns out it was also observed by the radial velocity to SuperWASP. The mass of the planet's definitely very roughly, as less than 4 mass of Jupiter.

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 13th April 2010, 9:09 am

Well, I just dropped by to report this little thing about the eccentricities of WASP-12 and WASP-14, and found myself blown away at what you guys were reporting.

This is pretty amazing.

Very interesting about how six of the 27 planets are retrograde.

Edit. The WASP Planets page has been updated with the new entries. (Nevermind! Looks like Borislav beat me to it)

Interesting that the discovery paper constrains the mass of WASP-33b the planet only as "< 4.1 MJ", yet the wasp-planets page gives it as < 2.22.

_________________
Caps Lock: Cruise control for 'Cool'!
avatar
Sirius_Alpha
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 3403
Location : Earth
Registration date : 2008-04-06

View user profile http://solar-flux.forumandco.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 13th April 2010, 10:32 am

Sirius_Alpha wrote:Very interesting about how six of the 27 planets are retrograde.

Why six? Five - Hat-P-7b, WASP-2b, WASP-8b, WASP-15b, WASP-17b.

When combining the 26 RM eff
ects that have been observed, we now see that eight planets are severely misaligned: XO-3b (H´ebrard et al. 2008; Winn et al. 2009c) , HD80606b (Moutou et al. 2009; Pont et al. 2009b; Winn et al. 2009a), WASP-14b (Johnson et al. 2009), Hat-P-7b (Winn et al. 2009b; Narita et al. 2009), WASP-8b (Queloz et al., submitted) and WASP-2b, WASP-15b and WASP17b. Of these eight, five have been found to be in retrograde orbits, four from our survey.

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 13th April 2010, 10:41 am

Such a large proportion of planets with retrograde orbit (5 / 26 = 20%) said that a lot of planets in general, was emitted from the planetary systems in the inter-planetary and inter-stellar perturbations and become rogue planets.

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Sirius_Alpha on 13th April 2010, 11:05 am

Borislav wrote:Why six? Five - Hat-P-7b, WASP-2b, WASP-8b, WASP-15b, WASP-17b.
I took it from their news section.
When these new results were combined with earlier observations of transiting exoplanets astronomers were surprised to find that six out of a larger sample of 27 were found to be orbiting in the opposite direction to the rotation of their host star

WASP-33 b is said to be retrograde in the discovery paper.

_________________
Caps Lock: Cruise control for 'Cool'!
avatar
Sirius_Alpha
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 3403
Location : Earth
Registration date : 2008-04-06

View user profile http://solar-flux.forumandco.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Borislav on 13th April 2010, 1:00 pm

Thank you Sirius_Alpha. Now I understand.

http://www.superwasp.org/documents/triaud2010_rossiter.pdf
Combining all previous 20 measurements of and our six and transforming them into a distribution of we find that about 80% of hot Jupiters have > 22 degree angle


In the Solar System is the angle between the ecliptic and the axis of the Sun 8 degrees.

In addition, now the angle measured about a quarter of the known transit of planets.

Borislav
Jovian
Jovian

Number of posts : 556
Registration date : 2008-11-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: SuperWASP Results

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 4 of 12 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 10, 11, 12  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum